Google Ramps Up Mobile Advertising with New Features

Google Ramps Up Mobile Advertising with New Features

Advertising Google

Over the next few years, mobile will drive nearly 90 percent of U.S. digital ad spend, according to Forrester. Businesses such as our client Snapfish are using mobile to achieve benefits such as a 343 percent increase in revenue from mobile app installs and a 756 percent return on ad spend. On May 14, Google made some major moves to accelerate our march toward a mobile advertising future:

App Deep Linking from Mobile Ads

Google announced that in coming weeks, Google will enable app deep linking from Google ads. Business that offers apps and also advertise on mobile will benefit from a more frictionless experience. Google will take users from shopping, display, and search ads right to the relevant page on your mobile app. Users with your app installed will complete a desired action (such as buying a product or booking a hotel stay) in a more personal and easier way with their check-out information pre-populated. As Google noted on its blog, “Early tests have been promising—on average, deep linked ad experiences drove 2X the conversion rates.”

In announcing app deep linking, Google shared the example of Magalu, one of Brazil’s largest retail companies. Magalu, seeing that its app was growing in popularity, enabled deep linking. According to Google, “By enabling deep linking, loyal customers who tapped on a Magalu ad were taken directly to the mobile app they already have installed, resulting in more than 40 percent growth in overall mobile purchases.”

Gallery Ads

Google also announced the launch of Gallery Ads later in 2019. Gallery Ads consist of swipeable images that will display on multiple pages on a user’s mobile phones. As Google announced,

By combining search intent with a more interactive visual format, gallery ads make it easier for you to communicate what your brand has to offer. We’ve found that, on average, ad groups including one or more gallery ad have up to 25 percent more interactions—paid clicks or swipes—at the absolute top of the mobile Search results page.

Advertisers will be able to feature up to eight images. As Search Engine Land (SEL) pointed out, one of the distinguishing features is the large carousel of swipeable images available. Per SEL, people can swipe through the images or click one to expand the gallery into a vertical view that users can then swipe down. At the end of the gallery, a call to action to visit the advertiser’s site appears.

Advertisers get charged for Gallery Ad interactions in one of two ways:

  • A cost-per-click basis when a user clicks on the headline to go to the advertiser’s website.
  • After the user swipes through three images in the gallery.

There is no word yet on an exact date when the format will appear. Advertisers can prepare now by experimenting with different ad, headline, and text options that optimize the available digital real estate.

What Advertisers Should Do

These developments have some important implications:

  • If you rely on an app to attract and service customers, creating ad experiences that link to your app is no longer ideal but is essential. As we’ve shared in our own client work, by varying ad formats wisely to account for factors such as seasonality, advertisers can make advertising and e-commerce more tightly integrated than ever.
  • Advertising on mobile is evolving to allow for more sophisticated storytelling. With a Gallery Ad, you can use multiple images to reveal new products with a series of images rather than collapsing the entire ad and offer into one image. In particular, the swipeable format makes it easier for customers to explore your products, which is especially useful for high-consideration products.

Now is the time to test and learn with Google’s new ad formats and tools. At True Interactive, we possess extensive experience helping businesses launch successful advertising online, including the use of Google products. Contact us. We are here to help.

Google Maps: Opportunities in Advertising

Google Maps: Opportunities in Advertising

Advertising Google

Bloomberg’s recent article speculating that Google could make Google Maps a bigger advertising platform, just as Google has done with search in general, has created a stir. On the one hand, the promise of more advertising development on Maps has generated excitement among businesses eager to become more visible on this popular navigation platform. At the same time, the news has triggered some concerns among industry watchers that advertising could become obtrusive. In fact, advertising already happens on Google Maps, and advertising holds promise so long as the ads provide value.

The Worry

As expressed in a recent BGR article, a major concern about advertising on Google Maps centers on the fear that user experience will erode: “Hopefully, Google’s reported interest in leaning on Maps as it hunts for new sources of revenue won’t mean the company goes overboard—like the way you have to scroll down past a slew of ads and highlighted results after conducting a Google Search, for example.”

This is a valid point. No one—including Google—wants to see the user experience on Google Maps become tarnished. Google needs to keep giving users reasons to stay on Google in its many forms. So the company has a strong incentive to monetize Google Maps in a way that keeps the consumer at the center of the experience.

Google appears to be honoring that commitment by exercising caution: Philipp Schindler, Google’s business chief, said at a recent conference that while Google Maps is “a really, really interesting playground [for advertising] going forward,” the basic directions provided by Google Maps are a “utility” that shouldn’t be tampered with. In other words, consumers shouldn’t be bombarded with ads when they are just looking to get from Point A to Point B.

The Reality

If history is any indicator, caution appears to be a feature of the Google Maps playbook. Technically, advertising on Google Maps is nothing new. As Bloomberg points out, “The company has tested ads in Maps for years.” And Google has proceeded thoughtfully all along, keeping the user in mind. Rajas Moonka, the director of product management for Google Maps, notes, “We’ve been pretty careful about not being very aggressive about how we present those to users because we don’t want users to feel like we’re overloading the experience.”

According to The Manifest, Google Maps ads already include features such as:

  • Promoted pins. These purple location pins are meant to stand out from the pack of familiar red location pins. When consumers tap on the Promoted Pin, which is paired with the advertising business’s logo, they access more information about the company and its products.
  • In-store promotions. A business advertising on Google Maps can show coupons and deals right on their ad.

Promotions are a great example of how an ad on Google Maps can be useful to all parties. If I search for “bookstores near me,” I am probably looking for something to buy—or I’m at least interested in browsing. If a ten-percent-off coupon from a nearby bookstore pops up during my search, I might be convinced to choose that store over another. In other words, a great promotion on Google Maps can turn a casual searcher into a bona fide customer, and prompt a scenario in which both business and consumer are winners.

What’s New Under the Sun

The Bloomberg piece isn’t suggesting that Maps is a new advertising frontier. The question being asked, rather, is are there different and more ways to use the app for advertising? We at True Interactive happen to think that the possibilities are legion. Consider the opportunities afforded if Google Maps advertising became personalized with content sponsored by different companies. In that scenario, a bookstore might serve up a personal ad on your Google Maps app based on your usage of Google Maps, just as already happens on Amazon.com when you get a personalized ad from a company that sells products on Amazon, based on your Amazon search history.

What You Can Do

In short, ads on Google Maps aren’t new, and their evolving services represent an opportunity for both businesses and consumers. We recommend that you:

  • Keep track of how Google is transforming itself.

Questions? Contact True Interactive to learn how to advertise on Google Maps and beyond.

 

 

Advertiser Q&A: Ad Customizers

Advertiser Q&A: Ad Customizers

Advertising Google

An ad customizer is an incredibly helpful tool that makes it possible for a business to make fine adjustments to an ad while the ad is still live.  The Google ad customizer is especially useful. But many businesses are not aware of the ad customizer and how it can help them. Let’s take a closer look.

1 What is an ad customizer?

An ad customizer is a feed that allows you to make changes to your ad copy while keeping that ad running 24/7. Put another way, an ad customizer makes it possible for you to make changes on the fly using a feed of business data that you swap as needed.

For example, let’s say you are a retailer running search ads for a throw blanket. Furthermore, let’s assume you need to change your ad frequently – running a 30-percent off price deal one week; then stopping the 30-percent off deal for a few weeks; and then running a 25-percent off promotion for another week depending on seasonal demand.  With an ad customizer, you can update your add accordingly in your feed while running the ad instead of having to take the ad down and create an entirely new promotion.

2 Does ad customizer work only for retail?

Any business can use ad customizer. For example, a service-area business such as a plumber or lawncare service might use an ad customizer to adapt a promotion by different zip codes in a particular city or region. A business might want to do so for a number of reasons, such as noticing an uptick in searches for plumbers or lawncare services in a particular zip code.

3 What are the benefits of using an ad customizer?

Using an ad customizer keeps your costs per click (CPC) steady. That’s because you don’t need to re-load an entirely new advertisement, which would affect your CPC. In addition, an ad customizer, when used well, can increase your click-through rate by making your content more targeted.

4 Is there a downside to using an ad customizer?

Using an ad customizer could result in an increase in CPC, but you’ll enjoy a better click-through rate, which is especially beneficial for seasonal ads or flash sales.

If you’re interested in using an ad customizer and need help, please reach out to us at True Interactive. We help businesses maximize the value of their online advertising.

Photo by Marvin Meyer on Unsplash

3D for Brands: No Longer a Novelty

3D for Brands: No Longer a Novelty

Advertising

3D is no longer a novelty. It’s becoming a way for businesses to share both advertisements and organic content. Case in point: Bing Ads recently teamed with Samsung to create 3D advertisements that display when consumers search for Samsung Galaxy devices on the Bing search engine.

Here’s how it works: an option for a 3D ad appears when an individual (using Bing) searches for the Samsung Galaxy S10 or S9 on their desktop. The ad, which expands to full screen size, can be manipulated by rotating the image, or zooming in on it. But it’s more than a zoom. Consumers see every aspect of the Samsung device plainly, from multiple angles, and can click on an image to access product details.

As Ravleen Beeston, UK head of sales for Microsoft Search Advertising, said in a statement to Netimperative, “These new 3D ads, unique to Bing, herald a new era of search advertising when it comes to displaying products through desktop search since they complement and enhance the experience for consumers looking to engage with a product.”

3D on Facebook

In addition, Facebook has made it possible for both businesses and consumers to post 3D photos, which makes organic content really pop. As discussed in this Digiday article, the 3D photos are “inherently thumb stopping.” If long-form video is showing a decline in effectiveness as attention spans likewise decline, 3D photos promise to be the next frontier. And brands are jumping at the chance to engage consumers in a fresh way. 3D can be especially useful for retailers trying to showcase products that require close inspection—expensive cellphones, for example, or even food. Food delivery service Bite Squad, for one, has capitalized on the opportunity by posting 3D photos, including one of BBQ from Famous Dave’s. “My goal is to catch your eyes as you [are] scrolling your feed,” Craig Key, CMO of Bite Squad, said, adding that just the sudden movement of an image can be a reason for users to scroll back up.

What You Should Do

At True Interactive, we recommend that you constantly look for ways to incorporate technology such as 3D if they are appropriate for your business:

  • Understand how 3D might add value to your paid and organic content. Don’t be gimmicky about using 3D. Have a specific goal in mind, such as increasing engagement with your ads, especially for products that require high levels of consideration.
  • Be aware of companies such as ThreeKit that provide technologies to help you design advertisements in 3D.
  • Work with an agency partner such as True Interactive that knows how to incorporate formats such as 3D into a larger advertising campaign.

Interested in exploring the opportunities inherent in 3D? Call us.

How Snapfish Capitalizes on the Power of Mobile Ads

How Snapfish Capitalizes on the Power of Mobile Ads

Advertising

How do you get a 756-percent return on ad spend? Our new case study about the work we performed for Snapfish will show you. We worked with Snapfish to create ads geared toward mobile over a one-year period. Goals included increasing:

  • Awareness and downloads of the Snapfish app.
  • Purchases via the app.

The campaign reaped major results, such as a 343 increase in revenue from mobile app installs and a 756-percent return on ad spend. Our case study provides even more details.

Mobile Ads Are on the Rise

This work is significant because mobile ads are on the rise. According to a recent Forrester report, between 2017 and 2022 mobile will drive 86 percent of growth in U.S. digital ad spending. In other words, mobile is really drawing the lion’s share of all online advertising.

Mobile Is Its Own Beast

But because of the way people engage with mobile ads, you need to understand how to do mobile right. As Mobile Marketing Association (MMA) research points out, the human brain takes less than half a second to connect with a mobile ad on an emotional level. In MMA’s Cognition Neuroscience Research project, approximately 900 individuals participated in a study in which eye-tracking and EEG monitoring were used to measure what consumers saw—and how they reacted. It took 400 milliseconds on average for consumers to see and react either positively or negatively to 67 percent of the mobile ads they saw. That’s a much faster response than that to ads shown on a desktop.

Mobile ads need to be designed in a format that captures the attention of consumers within 400 milliseconds! It’s imperative for marketers to understand the impact of mobile ads in the first second. We know how to do it right, as our new case study shows. Contact us.

LinkedIn Gets More Targeted

LinkedIn Gets More Targeted

Advertising

LinkedIn is getting more serious about being a platform for sharing more targeted paid and organic content.

I recently blogged about a major step forward for the 610-million strong business-to-business platform: the launch of live video. This was an important move for LinkedIn to catch up to platforms such as Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter, which already allow users to create live video.

What really jumped out at me when I heard about LinkedIn’s adoption of live video was LinkedIn’s intent to offer options for broadcasting content across LinkedIn as well as to more targeted groups within LinkedIn. Imagine, for example, using live video as part of a drip campaign with prospects, or for colleges to recruit talent.

The ability to target business-to-business audiences is a crucial advantage for the platform. And now, LinkedIn is playing to that advantage with the recent launch of another intriguing feature, Interest Targeting in Campaign Manager.

How Interest Targeting Works

For context: Campaign Manager makes it possible for companies to create LinkedIn ads such as Sponsored Content. With the tool, LinkedIn members can launch Sponsored Content campaigns to target different audiences on the platform. But the targeting has not always been as precise as LinkedIn would like it to be. For example, businesses have been able to target LinkedIn members based on information they share about themselves such as the college degrees they hold, but users don’t always share very useful information about themselves.

With Interest Targeting, businesses can target people based on content they like and share. Content likes and shares are crucial because they say something about topics that resonate with a user. For example, if a LinkedIn member is posting a lot of content about, say, the cost of attending college, a university might target that user with Sponsored Content that discusses its financial aid packages.

What You Should Do

I advise businesses to start incorporating these tools into your paid/organic content strategy (although live video for now remains available on an invite basis). It’s also important to incorporate a tool such as Interest Targeting with LinkedIn’s other targeting attributes such as job title even though those attributes have their limitations, as I’ve noted. When a business combines multiple targeting attributes, it can obtain a far more complete picture of its audience.

In addition, align these targeting features with your campaigns along the entire customer journey, from awareness to customer acquisition. Doing so will ensure that the tools achieve measurable business goals such as new hires or customers gained.

To learn more about how to incorporate platforms such as LinkedIn into your online marketing, contact True Interactive. We work with businesses to launch successful campaigns on platforms such as LinkedIn all the time. We are here to help.

The Super Bowl Is Over — But the Ads Endure

The Super Bowl Is Over — But the Ads Endure

Advertising

The Super Bowl was a super bust.

Super Bowl LIII achieved its lowest ratings since 2008. The game attracted 98.2 million viewers, down from 103 million viewers in 2018 and 111 million in 2017. And the NFL cannot blame a decline in general viewership from the regular season: ratings were up for the 2018-19 NFL season overall. On a positive note, digital viewership of the Super Bowl increased to a record of 2.6 million.

So what happened? Analysts blamed the appearance of two teams that failed to stir strong interest and a defensive struggle that bored viewers (the game was tied 3-3 going into the fourth quarter).

The decline in ratings has caused some to wonder whether it’s worth it for advertisers to spend $5 million on a 30-second Super Bowl ad. Well, I think that’s the wrong question. The real question is how can businesses maximize the lifespan of a Super Bowl ad beyond the big game itself?

If you’ve followed the Super Bowl year after year, you’re probably aware that businesses preview their Super Bowl ads by dropping teaser videos online weeks before the game, thus creating buzz, just like movie trailers do before a movie release. For example, in January Pringles distributed three teaser videos extolling the virtues of stacking different Pringles flavors while watching TV. These videos were accompanied by a PR blitz that resulted in coverage in publications such as Adweek.

And then after the game, companies enjoy a lift from the post-game analysis of Super Bowl ads. Even ads that get panned by critics create attention for their brands. It’s not like viewers are going to read a post-game ad critique in Advertising Age and boycott a 30-seond spot because it got panned. The criticism might pique their interest. Beyond the post-game analysis come opportunities for brands to distribute ads across multiple venues and optimize them for search. And Burger King is using already its socials to maintain public interest in its well-received spot featuring Andy Warhol eating a Whopper.

In a blog post I published February 1, I share how advertisers use digital media to extend the life of Super Bowl spots after the big game. I discuss the importance of brands exercising creative parity, or ensuring consistent messaging across digital and offline channels. As noted above, viewership of the Super Bowl online increased. Does your digital content match what people see on linear TV? Check out my post for more insight. And contact True Interactive to ensure that your digital ads maximize their value.