Advertising Powers Google’s Future

Advertising Powers Google’s Future

Google

In recent weeks, we have seen a flurry of earnings announcements from the major digital advertising platforms, including the big three: Amazon, Facebook, and Google. Together these companies account for 62 percent of all digital ad spend, according to eMarketer.

Google dominates with 37.1 percent market share. And yet, during earnings season, Amazon and Facebook have dominated the news even though Google’s ad business grew by 20 percent (year over year) for the final quarter of 2018. Google’s advertising revenues for the quarter were $32.6 billion, accounting for 83 percent of Alphabet’s revenue. For the full year, Google achieved $116.3 billion in ad revenue compared to $10 billion achieved by Amazon Advertising.

Where’s the Love for Google?

So where’s the love for Google? Here’s what I think is happening:

  • Surprise is more interesting than predictability. Facebook surprised analysts by reporting strong advertising growth for 2018, as we noted on our blog. Here is a company that has been rocked by data privacy scandals for months. And yet, the world’s largest social media platform just keeps growing, which raises questions about how important data privacy really is to Facebook’s community. As for Google? Advertising growth is expected. Even when Google surpasses analysts’ estimations, the pundits say “Yes, but . . . “ With Google’s latest quarterly earnings, analysts noted that Alphabet is spending more to support its ad business.

Google’s Advantages

But make no mistake: Google is going to continue to grow its ad business and in doing so will draw upon several advantages, such as:

  • A massive user base that relies on Google across multiple platforms and apps ranging from the Google search engine to Google Maps and YouTube.
  • A head start in using artificial intelligence to make advertising smarter and more effective. True, Google faces competition from Amazon and Facebook. But as I’ve noted, Google’s extensive AI tools are rapidly evolving.
  • Global reach. Amazon and Facebook are improving their advertising products to support international ad campaigns, but Google commands an already established global presence.
  • Strong content marketing that educates advertises on Google’s products. You can see for yourself from Google’s blogs.

What Businesses Should Do

My advice to businesses:

  • Stay abreast of advances in Google’s ad tools, especially with AI.

To maximize the value of your digital ad spend, contact True Interactive. We’re here to help.

Google Sunsets Average Position: What Advertisers Should Do

Google Sunsets Average Position: What Advertisers Should Do

Google

In September, Google will sunset one of the oldest Google Ad metrics, average position. Average position has traditionally helped businesses understand how high their ads rank above organic results in search engine results pages (SERPs). Google is replacing average position with four metrics designed to give advertisers a better sense of how their ads are ranking. Let’s unpack this news and its meaning.

What is average position?

As the name implies, average position provides an average for how high your ads appear above organic results in SERPs. Of course, an average rank of Number One is great. But an average is not terribly precise. Even if you enjoy a strong average, your ads still might experience wide variances.

What are the new metrics?

Come September, Google will replace average position with these metrics introduced in November 2018:

  • Absolute top impression rate: the percent of your ad impressions that are shown as the very first ad above the organic search results. This rate is calculated by taking all your Number One impressions divided by the total number of impressions.
  • Top impression rate: the percent of your ad impressions that are shown anywhere above the organic search results. This rate is calculated by dividing the total number of top impressions (above the organic search results) by the total number of impressions.
  • Absolute top impression share: the impressions you’ve received in the absolute top location (the very first ad above the organic search results) divided by the estimated number of impressions you were eligible to receive in the top location.
  • Top impression share: the impressions you’ve received in the top location (anywhere above the organic search results) compared to the estimated number of impressions you were eligible to receive in the top location.

Think of absolute top impression share and top impression share as a measure of your opportunities to have ads appear either at the top or anywhere above the organic search results. By contrast, absolute top impression rate and top impression rate provide actual results.

Why the change?

The new metric comes down to precision. Google wants advertisers focus on:

  • How often their ads appear above organic results on the first page.

And not:

  • Average ranking.

Of course, having four metrics to worry about makes life more complicated.

Do all these metrics matter?

We believe that the most important metrics are top impression rate to measure actual results – and top impression share to measure potential opportunities. Focusing on absolute top impression rate and absolute top impression share can become costly.

Top impression rate will give you a better idea of how often your ad is appearing above organic search results. Sure, absolute top impression rate will give you a sense of how often you rank Number One – but how many businesses can afford to keep bidding for a Number One ranking? If you are managing a budget, it’s just not realistic to gun for the best possible absolute top impression rate. Top impression rate should suffice.

What exactly is a favorable top impression rate?

You want your ads to appear among Top Four positions in SERPs. But it’s going to take some time and experimentation for you as an advertiser to figure out your ideal top impression rate.

What should advertisers do next?

This is a period of experimenting and learning before Google transitions everyone over to the new metrics. So, start using them and learning, availing yourself to Google’s blog content along the way. Two things you should do now:

  • Identify what a top impression rate is for you. To get started, look at historical data. Then test different ad campaigns. This process will require you to examine results and positions and monitor them over time. Also, outcomes for every advertiser will be different. Retail businesses will be different from media/entertainment, education, healthcare, and so on.
  • Monitor your costs per click (CPCs) closely. As your top impression share rate improves, your CPCs are going to increase.

Of course, True Interactive is here to help. We’ve been managing all aspects of performance marketing for years. Contact us for more insight. We know how to deliver results.

Advertiser Q&A: Google Product Feed Optimization

Advertiser Q&A: Google Product Feed Optimization

Google

In recent weeks, I have been blogging about tools such as showcase shopping ads that help advertisers succeed on Google. I would be remiss if I did not also touch upon a fundamental approach to ensuring your inventory is visible in your ads that appear on Google: product feed optimization.

What is Google product feed optimization?

Google product feed optimization refers to the steps that businesses take within the Google feed to ensure their advertisements work most effectively with Google’s algorithm. The more optimized your product content is, the more likely that your products are going to show up in paid search results when people look for products to buy.

Optimizing your feed can make your ads more visible. If you make your product feed accurate, your ads will be more aligned with how people search.

What’s the best way to optimize your products?

  • What’s really crucial is providing Google accurate metadata such as the title of your product, price, and color. It’s crucial to get the details right, down to size and color of clothing if you sell it. You cannot have duplicate keywords in the titles of your products, either. Avoid lengthy titles; otherwise, the customer may not see the actual product name. In addition, choose your keywords to position them to the front of the title. These are just some examples of minding your metadata.
  • Make sure you sync your product information with any paid search campaigns you are running. If you are running a 70-percent off holiday cards paid search campaign, make sure that message is consistent with what appears in your data feed.
  • Be complete. If you share different sizes of winter coats, make that data available. Better yet, list each as a separate product.

How do advertisers make sure Google has the right content to optimize?

A feed company or an agency (such as True Interactive) can put the data together for you. You supply raw data such as product description, product ID, links to relevant images, pricing. and landing page. Your feed company or agency partner then works with Google to ensure your product inventory appears where it should in your paid ads.

Should everyone be optimizing their product feed?

If you are advertising a physical product online, yes, you should absolutely optimize your product feed, whether you are a business-to-business or business-to-consumer brand.

Unfortunately, many brand mangers find the process of optimizing their feed to be tedious and unworthy of attention. But don’t make that mistake. If you don’t optimize your product feed, your advertising spend will be wasted because your competitors’ products will rank higher than yours (so long as they optimize their product feeds). And your customers won’t know about your products. So make sure you mind your product feeds. If you need help, contact True Interactive. We have deep experience with digital advertising including optimizing product feeds.

Photo source: https://pixabay.com/en/bar-ipad-mockup-business-computer-621033/

Advertiser Q&A: Google Showcase Shopping Ads

Advertiser Q&A: Google Showcase Shopping Ads

Google Uncategorized

Google has been beefing up its showcase shopping ads product to help retailers spice up their holiday advertisements. Showcase shopping ads make it possible for businesses to group together related products to merchandise them more effectively. The format is tailored for mobile viewing. Recently Google added new features such as video to make these ads more powerful. At True Interactive, we’ve been applying showcase shopping ads with favorable results. One of our clients running showcase shopping ads has seen an 80-percent higher click-through rate over standard shopping ads. This blog post explains showcase shopping ads based on questions we’ve received.

What exactly are showcase shopping ads?

Showcase shopping ads appear as a collection of shoppable images displaying different products offered by an advertiser. The ads are built to capitalize on broad keyword searches such as “winter sweaters.” The showcase shopping ads work this way:

  • Someone making a non-brand search for, say, winter sweaters will see in their search results display ads from different retailers with winter sweaters and promotional ad copy.
  • When the shopper clicks on the ad, they are taken to a landing page with a merchant’s line of winter sweaters. The shopping ad display, or showcase, resembles a brand page to the user, consisting of products the advertiser wants the user to see.

A shopper may click on an inventory and complete a purchase.

A business can create multiple showcase shopping ads. The header image can be different based on what is uploaded into each showcase shopping ad. In the above example of winter sweaters, a retailer could run a header image that focuses on sweaters but have another header image that focuses on outerwear for a “winter coat” search. The Google algorithm chooses which products appear based on variables such as the product titles, description, and type.

Who is this a good fit for?

It is highly recommended that you have at least 1,000 products in your inventory. There is no minimum budget. The format is effective for anyone who wants to get their products in front of a large audience because it’s based on broad keywords. It’s not for people competing for specific keywords. For bigger advertisers, showcase shopping ads are a good way to display multiple products for broad keywords. You can create an engaging photo and additional messaging that smaller businesses may not be able to afford.

Why is Google beefing up showcase ads?

The main reason Google is pushing showcase ads is that they are optimized for mobile. Salesforce recently predicted that mobile devices would dominate both traffic and orders for the entire 2018 holiday shopping season (68 percent of traffic and 46 percent of orders). On Black Friday alone, retailers saw $2.1 billion in sales from smartphones, accounting for 33.5 percent of Black Friday sales. The rise of mobile reflects broader shopping trends, and Google wants to capture a share of ad revenue associated with mobile shopping by offering a shoppable ad format.

What is the pay model?

The pay format is cost per engagement, not cost per click. The user has to be on the ad for 10 seconds or more, at which time the advertiser is charged. This approach can be a drawback. A click is a specific action. But having a page open for 10 seconds is a passive way to measure user intent. A person may not be really engaged with a product while a screen is open.

Any tips for getting the most out of Google showcase shopping ads?

Yes. Advertisers need to do two things:

  • Ensure all your products are grouped together in an easily findable way.
  • Have your products accurately labeled in each ad group.

Bottom line: Google showcase shopping ads give multiple advertisers a way to showcase multiple products for generic keywords that can otherwise be very expensive. If you compete for generic keywords in a mobile centric world – and who isn’t? – then you should consider Google showcase shopping ads. If you need help getting started or if you are running Google showcase shopping ads and want to take your game to the next level, contact True Interactive. We’re here to help.

Why Google Smart Shopping Is a Boon for Retailers

Why Google Smart Shopping Is a Boon for Retailers

Google

School is always in session at True Interactive. We regularly learn about Google products through Google’s Partner Academy, which keeps its advertising partners in the know about key product updates.  At a recent Partner Academy event in Chicago, we got immersed in Google’s recently launched smart shopping campaigns. Smart shopping combines multiple campaigns running on Google ad networks and uses machine learning to maximize their performance. My take: retailers should jump on smart shopping now to maximize your holiday campaigns.

Smart shopping combines shopping and dynamic remarketing campaigns into one product available on all networks where people are conceivably shopping:

  • Search.
  • Display.
  • Remarketing.
  • YouTube.

Smart shopping provides an efficient way for advertisers to roll up multiple campaigns into one. In addition, Google optimizes performance of your campaign across each network. According to Google’s blog,

With Smart Shopping campaigns, your existing product feed and assets are combined with Google’s machine learning to show a variety of ads across networks. Link to a Merchant Center account, set a budget, upload assets, and let us know the country of sale. Our systems will pull from your product feed and test different combinations of the image and text you provide, then show the most relevant ads across Google networks, including the Google Search Network, the Google Display Network, YouTube, and Gmail.

With Smart Shopping campaigns, your existing product feed and assets are combined with Google’s machine learning to show a variety of ads across networks. Link to a Merchant Center account, set a budget, upload assets, and let us know the country of sale. Our systems will pull from your product feed and test different combinations of the image and text you provide, then show the most relevant ads across Google networks, including the Google Search Network, the Google Display Network, YouTube, and Gmail.

To help you get the best value from each ad, Google also automates ad placement and bidding for maximum conversion value at your given budget.

The main advantage of the product is that Google serves your ads among the four networks where they perform best. In addition, smart shopping offers a more efficient spend, more sensible budgeting (you fund only one campaign and let Google optimize your budget), and a simplified approach to campaign management. The product is a boon for large retailers running complex campaigns, including, of course, holiday campaigns.

There is a downside, though: you cannot break out results by the four types of shopping experiences. Therefore you cannot really optimize toward the best performing format. When I asked Google about this limitation, I was told that providing this breakout is one of Google’s highest priorities for smart shopping campaigns in 2019. So, stay tuned.

In addition, you cannot apply negatives, such as negative keywords and topics, to your campaign. So if you want to, say, exclude news topics to avoid having your ad appear alongside an undesirable topic, you cannot do so.

The format also has limits. Smart shopping supports only two bid types: maximum conversion value and target return on ad spend. You also have to install the dynamic remarketing tag on to your site, which drops a cookie on users’ browsers and draws on the product ID as well as the revenue and other attributes to create audiences. (By contrast, with standard remarketing, you don’t need to fuss with this tag. You can use a generic tag that applies everywhere.)

Since smart shopping campaigns take about 15 days to really take effect, make sure you plan ahead so that you hit peak performance on days that matter most to you, such as Cyber Monday. If you have questions about how to deploy smart shopping campaigns, contact True Interactive. We’re here to help.

Note: this post is the first in a four-part series on recently launched ad products from Google. Watch our blog for more posts.

Image source: https://www.pexels.com/photo/working-macbook-computer-keyboard-34577/

Google Broadens Exact Match: What You Need to Know

Google Broadens Exact Match: What You Need to Know

Google

Our clients have been asking us about some recent news regarding how Google defines exact match. Here’s what’s going on and what you need to know:

Broadening “Exact Match”

Exact match is a keyword match type. With exact match keywords, a business can conduct a paid search campaign and reach potential customers searching for a specific keyword that you’re bidding on; or some close variant of it.

Google recently broadening the meaning of an exact match. Google is now looking at user intent when matching a query against a keyword. As Google noted in a blog post, Google will show ads for searches that include implied words, paraphrases, and other terms with the same meaning. Here’s how Google explains the change:

Let’s say you’re marketing for a travel business. If you’re using the exact match keyword [yosemite camping], your ads may show on other terms like “yosemite campground,” “campsites in yosemite,” or “yosemite national park ca camping.”

In each case, the intent of the search still matches the original keyword: to go camping in Yosemite National Park. However, you wouldn’t show on terms like “yosemite hotel” or “best yosemite camping,” because while both refer to staying at the park, the intent is different. Instead, these terms would match to the broad match version of this keyword.

This update represents a major change to Google’s algorithm. Why the change? According to Google, roughly 15 percent of searches conducted every day are new. As a result, potential customers might be looking for products and services using terms and phrases that are not even on your radar screen. But now, with machine learning, Google can cast its net wider without advertisers needing to manage an ever-expanding keyword list.

Benefits

Both advertisers and Google should benefit from this change. Businesses should be able to reach more people using Google’s advertising products. According to Google, advertisers using mostly exact match keywords see 3 percent more exact match clicks and conversions on average, with most coming from queries they aren’t reaching today. Google also benefits by matching user queries to a broader pool of keywords – which means more clicks, traffic, and revenue for Google.

What You Should Do

I advise any advertiser to keep a close eye on your search query reports (SQRs). You may notice unexpected queries matched to your keywords. You may need to add keyword negatives to modify your campaign. All algorithm changes have an impact. So watch your reports closely and be ready to adapt as needed. If you have additional questions about exact match targeting, contact True Interactive. We’re happy to help!

Google Responsive Ads: What You Need to Know

Google Responsive Ads: What You Need to Know

Google

Google is working harder to woo advertisers as the company faces stiffer competition from Amazon and Facebook. For example, Google rolled out responsive search ads and responsive display ads to make the advertising platform more flexible for brands. It is important that advertisers understand these features and how to maximize their value.

How Responsive Search and Display Ads Work

According to Google, responsive search ads make it possible for advertisers to enter multiple headlines (up to 15) and descriptions (up to four) when creating a search ad. Then Google Ads applies machine learning to automatically test different combinations and learn which combinations perform best. In addition, per Google, advertisers can add a third headline and second description to your text ads, and your descriptions can have up to 90 characters.

Responsive display ads work the same way, with advertisers submitting up to up to 15 images, five headlines, five descriptions, and five logos for a display ad. As with responsive search ads, Google uses machine learning to test different combinations and show the ads that work best. According to Google, “On average, advertisers see 10% more conversions at a similar CPA when using multiple headlines, descriptions, and images with responsive display ads (versus a single set of assets).”

What You Need to Know

Based on our experience with clients, I see some near-term ramifications:

  • Your advertising will become more effective. These formats are exciting because they capitalize on machine learning to scale your advertising content. As Google notes, “Great display ads assist consumers using rich images and useful information. However, showing the most relevant and engaging ads across millions of sites and apps isn’t easy.” Responsive ads are a compelling solution.
  • Organic content pays a price. By making ads more effective, Google will push organic listings down in search results.
  • You need to invest more effort. Yes, Google does do the heavy lifting when it comes to executing on your ads. But to get the most out of this format, you’ll need to come up with more variants of your message and images. (That’s the point of responsive search and display: Google takes multiple inputs to give you optimal results.) In addition, you’ll want to monitor which assets are performing best, which takes time and effort (although Google provides tips for doing so on its blog).

What You Should Do

  • Review your messaging strategy. Having more variants of your content presents an opportunity to review your messaging and differentiators. You obviously don’t want to create content willy-nilly. All your content should support your brand in some way.
  • Learn. The Google blog links I’ve shared above contain a number of tips for maximizing the value of these ads. For instance, with responsive search ads, Google advises that you include at least one of your keywords in your headlines, and create headlines that are relevant to the keywords you’re targeting. Furthermore, provide as many distinct headlines as you can. Per Google, “More headlines gives Google Ads more options for assembling your messages into relevant ads, which may increase performance.”

At True Interactive, we’re working with clients to plan and execute advertising with these and many other tools. We’ll report our learnings on our blog. Watch for our posts, and contact us if you need help with your online advertising.