New Report Underscores Importance of Google My Business

New Report Underscores Importance of Google My Business

Google

Software provider Moz has released its 2020 State of Local SEO industry report, and the insights are revealing. The report, which surveys the priorities of website owners across several industries, focuses on organic content, but it’s still a useful tool for advertisers. That’s because a brand’s priorities for organic content are usually a good indication of its advertising priorities; in short, the Moz report provides insights into digital marketing that can influence online advertising. Two headliners, according to Moz? Google My Business (GMB) and Maps. Read on for more details about these tools, and how they might support your business.

The Growing Importance of Google My Business

One of the big take-aways of the report is the growing influence of businesses’ GMB listings. In fact, according to Moz, businesses are increasingly viewing GMB listings as critical to their local search result rankings: “75% of marketers believe that the use of Google My Business profile features impacts rankings in the local pack.” The report recommends keeping abreast of GMB features and management, making sure details such as categories, and descriptions, are up-to-date. In short, more businesses are investing time in their GMB page, and you should, too.

Google Maps: More Than a Wayfinding Tool

Another recommendation: mind your presence on Google Maps. The report casts a spotlight on Google Maps’ rise, describing it as “a go-to tool for how consumers navigate their community.” And as consumers find their way around an area, it behooves brands to position themselves front and center. The benefits of learning the nuances of Maps, and keeping one’s map intelligence accurate, cannot be overstated.

These findings underscore how significant GMB listings and Google Maps are to businesses. Google continues to dominate the online landscape even if it is having a down year in the advertising sector.

What You Should Do

  • We recommend that you maintain a strong strategy for maximizing GMB as a platform for paid and organic content. As we have blogged here, more than half of search queries on Google result in no ensuing clicks to brand sites. That’s because users frequently find what they need on GMB pages—when businesses have taken the time to make them rich and informative, that is. Make sure your GMB page has substance, from compelling images to accurate location data. As we recommended earlier on our blog, it’s important that you link your GMB account to your Google Ads account. As Google discusses in this tutorial, linking your GMB account to your Google Ads account makes it possible for your ads to appear with location extensions, which encourage customers to visit your storefront. Through location extensions, customers can see your ads with location information such as your address. And then they can get more information about your location by clicking on location extensions.
  • We also suggest that you have a plan for maximizing Google Maps as a platform for paid and organic content. As we blog here, Google has managed to effectively accommodate advertising without corroding user experience on Maps. That’s good news for brands and users alike. A satisfied user will continue to use Google Maps—and subsequently see content, such as promotions, posted by savvy advertisers.

Note the mention of organic and paid content in both suggestions above. The rationale is this: if you are going to spend more time building up your Maps and GMB organic content, why stop there? Google makes a plethora of advertising tools available, tools that can increase your visibility even more—and attract more customers. Get to know those tools.

Contact True Interactive

Through offerings like Google My Business and Maps, Google can help your brand achieve the visibility you desire. Not sure how to make the most of these platforms? Contact us. We can help.

What Advertisers Should Do about Zero-Click Searches on Google

What Advertisers Should Do about Zero-Click Searches on Google

Google

Bad news for businesses in their ongoing efforts to optimize their websites for search traffic: for the first-time ever, more than half of search queries on Google result in no clicks to sites. According to marketing analytics firm Jumpshot, most people who search for content from Google find what they want from the search engine results page and don’t bother to click through to a website for more information. What happens on Google stays on Google.

In addition, per Jumpshot, Google continues to send “a huge portion of search clicks to their own properties . . . Those properties include YouTube, Maps, Android, Google’s blog, subdomains of Google.com, and a dozen or so others.”

Why the Rise in Zero-Click Searches?

Why the rise in zero-click searches? Because more than ever, Google is doing its job serving up essential information in response to queries. Over the years, Google has made it possible for business owners to build out rich, informative Google My Business (GMB) pages with information ranging from offers to customer/ratings reviews. Those pages form the foundation for businesses to be found on Google properties such as Google Maps.

GMB pages have become so useful and informative that people are finding what they want (“Find a grocery store near me”) in the knowledge panel of a business without needing to go to a business’s website. In fact, a company’s GMB page is now the single-most important way to attract local search traffic, according to Moz.

Meanwhile it’s no surprise that Google sends a huge proportion of clicks to its own sites. Facing rising competition from Amazon Advertising, Google is under pressure to keep its advertising business strong. To do so, Google needs to keep eyeballs on Google properties, where users are exposed to Google advertising (in May, we noted on our blog that Google is expanding its ad business on Google Maps, to name just one example).

What Advertisers Should Do about Zero-Click Searches

So what should advertisers do? You should:

  • Build up your GMB page. If organic queries are increasingly going to your GMB and staying there, then make sure you’ve optimized your GMB content – including images, customer ratings/reviews, and location data – to be found.
  • Link your GMB account to your Google Ads account. As Google discusses in this tutorial, linking your GMB account to your Google Ads account makes it possible for your ads to appear with location extensions, which encourage customers to visit your storefront. Through location extensions, customers can see your ads with location information such as your address. And then they can get more information about your location by clicking on location extensions.
  • Make sure you’re capitalizing on Google ad products throughout the Google ecosystem. With Google keeping more searchers on Google and its properties, it behooves advertisers to capitalize on where that search activity is occurring.

In addition, Jumpshot’s Rand Fishkin suggests that advertisers seek out keywords whose results have higher click-through rate (CTR) opportunity. He told Search Engine Land, “I think paid search CTR will probably decline over the next few months. That’s because historically, each time Google changes how paid ads appear in the search results (like the late May shift to the black ‘Ad’ labels in mobile SERPs), ad CTR rises, then slowly declines as more searchers get familiar with the ad format and develop ad blindness.”

At the same time, I would be surprised if Google were to leave itself vulnerable to the risk that searchers won’t click on ads.

Contact True Interactive

At True Interactive, we know how to help businesses navigate the complex waters of online advertising, including advertising on Google. Contact us. We’re here to help.