How Brands Are Making Sweet Music on Spotify

How Brands Are Making Sweet Music on Spotify

Advertising

Spotify is more than a popular, iconic streaming service. It’s a platform for businesses to reach an audience—specifically Millennials and Generation Z—through advertising. And there’s much to be learned from the brands that know how to do it right. Read on for some examples of companies who have advertised on Spotify in smart, creative ways that push the envelope and speak directly to their target audience:

Pepsi “Maxes” Summer Fun

Armed with the knowledge that customers are more likely to crave a cold drink in hot weather, PepsiCo turned up the heat by promoting Pepsi Max, a low-calorie, sugar-free cola. As part of their “Max Your Summer” campaign, which reached out to Australian consumers aged 18 to 49, the beverage giant used dynamic advertising on Spotify, including audio spots focusing on events co-sponsored by Pepsi. The campaign, which ran during the Australian summer, November 2017 to February 2018, was meant to keep listeners up to speed on summer fun in their area, with ads tailored to day of the week and consumer location. The localized approach yielded tangible benefits for Pepsi. According to Power Digital Marketing, “Users who saw the campaign were 34% more likely to agree that ‘Pepsi Max is the #1 tasting no-sugar cola.’”

Hungry? Have a Snickers

In 2018, Spotify ads for the Snickers candy bar operated under a unique premise: that consumers who listen to music outside their typical tastes or comfort zones are in fact . . . hungrier. In creating its campaign, Snickers drew from Spotify data suggesting that a consumer who makes an unexpected switch to a different musical genre or artist is in a different mood, and that mood changes can correlate with hunger. The resulting ad, which targeted listeners who changed things up, featured faux musician “Aneta Snickers” rapping about how when you are hungry, “you’re not you.” The answer for the presumably hungry listener? A Snickers bar, natch.

Jose Cuervo Wants Your Favorite Playlist

In a Spotify campaign targeting United Kingdom college students, Spotify and Jose Cuervo tequila partnered with 50 student radio stations in the UK to collect playlists curated by students from 50 universities. The lists were subjected to a public vote; student consumers could vote for their uni playlist and the chance to win a concert. The campaign was a success for Jose Cuervo and Spotify: votes far exceeded campaign predictions. And it was a success for students at the winning University of Portsmouth, who enjoyed a concert headlined by Alexis Taylor (Hot Chip) and Orlando Weeks (The Maccabees).

Chuze Fitness Reaches Out When You Work Out

Chuze Fitness has also made the most of the Spotify platform. The gym chain, which has been growing nationally, wanted to create brand awareness for their new locations. Of course, when people work out, they listen to music. So Chuze Fitness worked with Spotify to deliver their message. The resulting advertising campaign geo-targeted the city where the new Chuze Fitness gyms were located, even as it specifically targeted people listening to “fitness” playlists. The strategy proved profitable: according to Power Digital Marketing, Chuze Fitness “saw an uptick in their brand interest on Google through Google trends within the city [where] they were advertising.”

Why Spotify?

Companies who work with Spotify can benefit from the platform’s strong brand. They also can maximize their reach thanks to Spotify’s exceptional targeting tools, such as:

  • Interest targeting, which helps brands understand consumers’ passions via their listening preferences, and subsequently connect with a specific audience in a meaningful—and effective—way.
  • Real-time context targeting, which allows brands to target people based on their habits—and tendencies—at specific times of day. Someone waking up is typically in a different frame of mind than someone studying, or to use the Snickers example, someone who is hungry. Understanding the psychology of users at different times, and when might be the best time to share a branded message with that user, is a powerful tool.

Of course, Spotify isn’t the only game in town. The platform faces stiff competition from Apple Music, Amazon, and other streaming services. But in a crowded market for music streaming, Spotify still stands out.

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Why Advertisers Embrace Nostalgia Marketing

Why Advertisers Embrace Nostalgia Marketing

Advertising

In Rob Sheffield’s autobiographical memoir, Love Is a Mix Tape, Sheffield observes, “I get sentimental over the music of the ‘90s. Deplorable, really. But I love it all. As far as I’m concerned the ‘90s was the best era for music ever, even the stuff that I loathed at the time, even the stuff that gave me stomach cramps.” Sheffield is talking about nostalgia. Smart marketers know how to tap that vein. Research shows us that nostalgia gives our lives, whether we are 20 or 80, a sensation of comfort, continuity, and meaning. What businesses wouldn’t want to evoke those feelings in a customer? Hence the rise of nostalgia marketing, which uses past themes or products to evoke a specific, positive emotion in customers. Nostalgia marketing isn’t new, exactly — when you see the word “throwback” in relation to a brand, that’s nostalgia marketing at work — but in recent weeks, shows such as Netflix’s Stranger Things have underlined just how powerful nostalgia marketing can be.

Why Nostalgia Works

The irony of nostalgia marketing is, of course, that the past helps make a business more relevant to current interests. Look a little deeper, though, and it’s not hard to see the allure. Research shows that nostalgia can act as an antidote to boredom, loneliness, and anxiety. It can literally make people feel warmer on cold days. And from the perspective of the advertiser, it’s a gold mine in that it can reach multiple generations equally effectively. Nostalgia marketing appeals to the college student stressed by exams who finds refuge in references to beloved cartoons from their childhood. It also attracts the overworked middle-aged manager, who gets a boost from that can of New Coke. And therein lies the power of nostalgia marketing: it’s not limited to a certain age bracket.

In The Upside Down . . . and Beyond

Stranger Things, the Netflix series that is equal parts sci fi exploration of the parallel universe of The Upside Down and‘80s homage, provides a great example of nostalgia marketing. Look no further than the copious New Coke references in the show’s Season 3, which takes place in 1985, the same year New Coke made its short-lived (79-day!) debut. Sure, New Coke may have been a debacle at the time, but fast-forward to 2019, when the beverage giant has the opportunity to turn an embarrassment into a win. By making New Coke (briefly) available again — Coke spent six months poring over records to make sure the New Coke design and recipe were properly recreated — and generating advertising tie-ins to the show, Coke is hoping it can play on nostalgia to court older consumers who remember the advent of New Coke in the first place (whether they liked it or not). But it’s not just an older generation that’s being targeted: younger Netflix viewers from the millennial and Gen Z generations love the show, and because they don’t have any strong negative associations with New Coke, they represent a rich new demographic.

Pepsi has also been known to rewind the clock. In 2013, PepsiCo took advantage of the social phenomenon #ThrowbackThursday to generate some buzz about product, posting images of its “throwback” Pepsi sodas, which were made with “real sugar” as opposed to the high-fructose corn syrup soda manufacturers switched to back in the 1980s in response to tariffs.

Other brands, such as Wendy’s, have used classic photos for Throwback Thursday posts; Wendy’s underlined the nostalgia by pointing out how the fast-food chain debuted the first modern-day pick-up window.

Wimbledon, the oldest tennis tournament in the world, and arguably the most prestigious, has also embraced nostalgia in a bid to generate more revenue. As reported in Digiday, the tournament, as part of a six-week campaign, “created an immersive, theatrical recreation of the 1980 final between Bjorn Borg and John McEnroe. Billed as a virtual time capsule of sorts, the recreation of the match was backed by archive footage from the real one on the tournament’s social media channels.”

Doing Nostalgia Marketing the Right Way

Like any marketing strategy, nostalgia marketing comes with a few ground rules. To achieve the best results, you want to do it right, namely:

  • Know your audience. Are they going to understand or appreciate the throwback?
  • Leverage all the tools you can, ranging from social to online advertising.
  • Know the nostalgia “hot spots.” Create content that targets your audience’s elementary and high school years, generally ages six to 16. And don’t forget “parental nostalgia,” the nostalgia many parents feel for their children’s childhoods.
  • Try to draw on content creators who actually lived in the time or place your brand is recalling. Someone who participated in the experience in the first place is much more likely to invest the marketing with emotion and meaning.
  • Take advantage of brand history if your company has been around awhile. Nostalgia strategies can be built around reminding customers of the positive experiences they’ve had with a product over the years.
  • Pay attention to the details and get the callback right.

Bottom line: authenticity is key.

Contact True Interactive

True Interactive knows how to plan and implement digital advertising of all kinds, including throwback themes. Contact us to build your business with online advertising.

Does Your Brand Have a Newsjacking Strategy?

Does Your Brand Have a Newsjacking Strategy?

Marketing

Newsjacking has become an increasingly popular but risky marketing and PR tactic. The term “newsjacking,” made popular by David Meerman Scott, refers to marketers capitalizing on news and topical issues to build awareness for their brands. Many companies have done so (in real time or near real time) to create an impact for their brand, a notable example being  Nike’s 2017 Equality ad that promotes equality both on and off the field of play.

It’s tempting for businesses to attempt newsjacking when they see the kind of visibility that can come from deploying the tactic. But brands need to proceed with caution. Businesses have incurred backlash when newsjacking sensitive topics such as celebrity deaths, and newsjacking can come across as too opportunistic.

But just because newsjacking is risky, it doesn’t mean you should ignore this tactic. Newsjacking can deliver tremendous value if you do it right. Here are some tips to keep in mind as you consider newsjacking:

Know What Topics Your Brand Is Comfortable Covering

We all have a different understanding of what can be controversial. Brands have suffered when they try to appeal to an audience whose sensibilities and values don’t correlate with a brand’s perception of current events. It is important to discuss with your team exactly what topics should be covered and what areas you would like to shy away from. This necessity became increasingly important with the 2016 Presidential election. Certain brands openly discussed their political stance. Others tapped into the news generated by the election without explicitly taking a side. A great example of the latter: Bisquick with its “Make America Pancakes Again.” The brand capitalized on a campaign slogan without suggesting any specific political ties.

Of course, politics is a divisive topic and can really strike at a consumer’s emotions. It is imperative to measure the risks and rewards of commenting directly on political issues. The safer bet is to appeal towards pop culture and the current zeitgeist, which can be easily cultivated by monitoring Google Trends and trending hashtags on social media. Finding topics that appeal to your brand values and your audience’s values can help you to tailor your messaging and reap the benefits.

Have a Purpose and a Story

If you are going to newsjack, do so with a purpose with a definable goal, such as increasing brand lift. And make sure you develop a compellingly creative story to tell. If you are unable to come up with something creative or you are unable to provide strong content for the news, it is best to sit out the story.

Audi’s May 2015 “Birth” ad is an example of newsjacking with a purpose and a story. The company’s ad played into the birth of the Royal baby, but also promoted its own new baby, the Audi RS3, which was birthed from a larger Audi model. The company advertised the new RS3 with a strong marketing campaign that was relevant to current events.

Plan Content When Possible

It is not uncommon for newsjacking to be created on the spot, but you can also plan ahead with events, such as major award shows and sporting events whose dates are known months in advance. Coca-Cola capitalized on the popularity of the 2016 Summer Olympics with a campaign that celebrated individual athletes with advertising and social media posts such as this one:

When creating your social media calendar, think of what events are coming up and consider the power of visual storytelling to tap into the appeal of those events.

Do Your Research

Although it is good to be the first to jump on a news story, make sure you have your facts straight before posting content related to breaking news, and make sure your ad reflects cultural truth. Especially when newsjacking a story in real time, carefully vet your research on a topic to ensure that you are not providing inaccurate details to your audience. And research the credibility of the story you want to tell. A brand’s credibility can easily be affected by sharing content (whether an ad or a tweet) that is inaccurate, false, or out of step with the cultural zeitgeist.

A recent example of being out of step can be found in the now infamous Pepsi ad featuring Kendall Jenner. The ad was an attempt to reach the millennial audience by appealing to the culture of activism and goals of unity, but missed the mark according to many critics by diminishing the importance of all the work that activists are doing. Perhaps had Pepsi done more research ahead of the ad, the company would have uncovered how serious, personal, and passionate protests are as a social statement. The company might have then avoided creating an ad that associated a can of Pepsi with social change agendas and thus came across as trivializing social protest as a form of self-expression.

Avoid Anything Related to Death or Disaster

It is best to steer clear of negative events when newsjacking even if a company is attempting to express sympathy. Companies that use disasters or fatalities to boost their brand appearance create an unfortunate association with their brand. Additionally, commenting on topics like celebrity deaths can be equally as problematic. Just to be clear: if your brand is donating to a cause or shedding light on an issue without attempting to promote sales, you are probably not creating a newsjack (but you should be very careful about the tone of your message anyway). But when newsjacking, be cognizant of what you are implying with your post.

Newsjacking can be a positive tool and promote your brand while allowing you to comment on cultural issues. To begin working newsjacking into your own marketing calendar, start to look ahead at what major events will be occurring. For instance, with the NBA and NHL playoffs in full swing and with the Major League Baseball season under way, a sport-related newsjack may be highly relevant to your audience. Or consider an entertainment event such as the Tony Awards in June. A keen eye for events and a willingness to follow the tips outlined in this post will help you get started with newsjacking. Contact True Interactive. We can help you.

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