Research Shows That Having a Strong Social Media Presence Pays Off

Research Shows That Having a Strong Social Media Presence Pays Off

Facebook

Having a strong social media presence pays off for your brand – literally. That’s what research from Sprout Social shows. Sprout Social surveyed consumers and social marketers between February 28 and March 4. As reported in Mobile Marketer, the survey reveals:

  • Nine out of 10 people purchase from brands they follow on social media.
  • Seventy-five percent of people have increased their spend on companies they follow on social. That’s a 12 percent increase from 2019, a leap that’s particularly noteworthy given the COVID-19 pandemic.

Moving Forward

These findings validate what we wrote in a recent post: brands advertising on social media can connect with people who are willing to spend money even during the coronavirus era. Knowing this, how does a company move forward during such an unprecedented time? Here’s what we suggest you do:

  • Make sure you have a strong social media presence. As we’ve noted, use of social media has surged in the first quarter, with engagement on platforms like Facebook, WhatsApp, and Instagram spiking 40 percent or more — this despite, or even because of, the pandemic. In short, not only are people willing to spend on brands, there are more people on social, period. Brands that advertise on social will reach that larger audience.
  • Make sure your content is engaging, and that you engage with the audience. According to the Sprout Social report, 61 percent of consumers say that engagement with the audience is the brand characteristic that is most meaningful to them.
  • Complement your advertising with strong customer service. What does strong customer support look like now? Per Sprout Social, responding to people quickly is a strong barometer of customer service. As noted in Mobile Marketer, 40 percent of consumers expect brands to respond within the first hour of connecting through social media; and 79 percent expect a response in the first 24 hours.
  • Reach out to younger consumers in a way that matters most to them; that means a strong presence on YouTube and Instagram. Gen Z is the largest age cohort in the United States, and Millennials remain sizeable. It’s important that brands understand where Gen Zers spend their time. Right now, visual content is the key to Gen Zers’ hearts. The Sprout Social report reveals that social sharing platforms highlighting videos and photos, such as Google’s YouTube and Facebook’s Instagram, are becoming more and more popular with younger consumers. As reported in Mobile Marketer, “Almost three quarters (73%) of Generation Z said they plan to use Instagram more often, while 65% said they plan to spend more time on YouTube.” So it’s no surprise that Facebook just purchased Giphy and will integrate the business with Instagram.

Finally, make sure that you stay abreast of the various tools that are constantly made available to businesses to maximize the value of their social media spend. For instance, Google has adapted the YouTube masthead ad format for the era of connected TV.

Contact True Interactive

Eager to build a stronger social media presence? Contact us. We can help.

Photo by Austin Distel on Unsplash

How Brands Have Made the Pivot with Nimble Marketing

How Brands Have Made the Pivot with Nimble Marketing

Advertising

On the True Interactive blog, we have discussed examples of how businesses are adapting the tone of their online advertising to remain relevant—and appropriate—during the pandemic. But some brands have needed to do more than adjust their tone; they’ve had to adapt their marketing strategies and even their business models to address specific needs or limitations brought about by COVID-19. Here are some examples:

Raising Cane’s

Raising Cane’s, the fast-food chain specializing in chicken fingers, saw the pandemic coming. As discussed in QSR, Raising Cane’s founder and co-CEO Todd Graves closely followed news of COVID-19 and its spread throughout China; Graves and his team knew it was only a matter of time before the virus moved abroad, and they were quick to take action when it did. Health and food safety, always a priority, got even more attention. And the restaurant bolstered its ability to manage drive-through service rather than sit-down dining, even as the maintenance of food quality remained a priority. The operational change demanded a marketing pivot.

Raising Cane’s changed its message, including its digital advertising, to focus on its heightened focus on safety. The business also ratcheted up promotion of its drive-through service. Especially in the early days of the pandemic as shelter-in-place mandates took hold, it was not always clear to people which restaurants were open and which ones were not. In addition, the company mobilized part of its work force to support healthcare workers on the front lines fighting the pandemic, ranging from having employees sew masks to donating food to hospitals. The company talked about these efforts, which encouraged others to step up, too. In doing so, Raising Cane’s also aligned its actions with consumer preferences: according to a Kantar study, more than three-quarters (77 percent) of the general population would like to see brands talk about how they’re helpful in the new everyday life.

Raising Cane’s realized a benefit from its marketing pivot: a temporary dip in sales that occurred when coronavirus hit U.S. shores was followed by a return to pre-COVID-19 sales numbers. Now Raising Cane’s is making another interesting change as it promotes a sponsorship of virtual musical performances to benefit people on the front lines fighting COVID-19. How about a song with those chicken fingers?

D’Artagnan

For meat and poultry seller and manufacturer D’Artagnan, pivoting has meant changing market focus. Before the pandemic, 75 percent of the company’s revenue came from sales to restaurants with some revenue coming from direct sales to consumers online. But as restaurants closed in response to lockdown orders, that business dropped 80 percent. At the same time, grocery stores saw a leap in business as people began eating at home more. D’Artagnan recognized that trend and adapted by tapping into it, overhauling its operations to meet grocery market needs as well as a 700 percent increase in demand from customers suddenly ordering directly from the D’Artagnan website. The company pivoted its online marketing in a few crucial ways:

  • Ramping up special deals on its website to attract more consumers.
  • Advertising its direct-to-consumer business with Google Advertising, including promotion of overnight delivery; and reliance on social media to promote deals such as Mother’s Day specials.
  • Promoting an expansion of at-home delivery services, which made consumers in some previously untapped markets aware that the company was open for business.
  • Redirecting its sales team to build relationships with supermarkets.

The switch has demanded flexibility from D’Artagnan’s 280 employees, who have need to operate differently. The willingness to meet those challenges has been rewarded with sustained business, and sustained business has meant jobs: The Wall Street Journal reported in mid-April that the company had retained all its employees.

Peloton

In an era when people are traveling less and doing more of everything at home, this maker of exercise equipment has shifted focus from the use of Peloton bikes in hotels and gyms to at-home use. App Annie explains that Peloton optimized for search on both their app and web site, taking out words people aren’t searching for right now — “at the gym,” for example —and replacing them with phrases touting an at-home experience. They also dialed up at-home trial promotions, increasing their free trial from 30 to 90 days. The extended trial period is highlighted in the first sentence of Peloton’s iOS app description, a good way to reach out as customers get their heads around the necessity of getting fit at home. The company has also relied on Google Advertising to promote its ability to stream fitness classes to consumers. Recently Peloton reported a 66-percent surge in sales. Clearly, people are ready for a workout.

Contact True Interactive

To succeed with online advertising in 2020, contact True Interactive. Read about some of our client work here.

Google’s Shopping Campaigns with Partners: How It Works

Google’s Shopping Campaigns with Partners: How It Works

Google

Google has a track record of recognizing needs, and creating products to solve those needs. In the book How Google Works, authors Eric Schmidt and Jonathan Rosenberg describe a strong culture in which problem solving is encouraged—and facilitated. How Google Works came out in 2014. Six years later, Google continues to prove that problem-solving and innovation are core strengths: one need look no further than a product like Shopping campaigns with partners. Still in beta mode, Shopping campaigns with partners has been created by the tech giant to make it easier for nonretailers such as manufacturers to sell their own products online. How? By giving those brands a way to run advertising that links directly to any commerce site. Read on to learn more.

What Is Shopping Campaigns with Partners?

Shopping campaigns with partners essentially puts products in places where shoppers will see them. Increasingly, that means a digital presence: according to Google, 56 percent of consumer time spent with media is on digital. Shopping campaigns with partners capitalizes on the importance of digital, facilitating a collaboration between brands and retailers, and then connecting the two by directing consumers from ads that appear throughout Google ad touchpoints like Google Search or YouTube.

Why Shopping Campaigns with Partners Matters

It’s easier and more efficient for businesses to advertise when they don’t have to manage a commerce site of their own, and Shopping campaigns with partners takes that burden off of manufacturers. But the partnership the product forges clearly benefits both parties: as Google notes, “brand manufacturers . . . promote their products while increasing traffic to retailers of their choice.” The mutual benefits don’t end there. As part of the partnership, manufacturers partially fund the retailer’s advertising cost for the manufacturer’s products. In return, retailers provide attribution reporting for the products highlighted in the campaign.

Who Is Using Shopping Campaigns with Partners?

Shopping campaigns with partners will eventually be launching in every country where Google Shopping products are offered. Some manufacturers, such as the Estée Lauder Companies, have already had an opportunity to test the capabilities of the product during its beta phase. In this instance, Shopping campaigns with partners paired Estée Lauder with a retail partner in the United States; the campaign was specifically meant to position and promote Estée Lauder designer fragrances, and maximize holiday demand. The strategy paid off: thanks to Shopping campaigns with partners, clickshare of the targeted fragrances increased 70 percent.

True Interactive is ahead of the curve. We’re working with businesses to use the product to support their online commerce needs. We’ll report on results later!

Contact True Interactive

Eager to learn more about how Shopping campaigns with partners might benefit your brand? Contact us.

Amazon, Facebook, and Google Earnings: Takeaways for Advertisers

Amazon, Facebook, and Google Earnings: Takeaways for Advertisers

Advertising

The week of April 27 was especially important for the online advertising world. The three companies that account for nearly 70 percent of online ad spend – Amazon, Facebook, and Google – all announced quarterly earnings. Here was the first time advertisers would see the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on ad spend. And the news was better than expected.

Amazon Advertising Surges

Amazon announced a rise in quarterly revenue as people sheltering in place increasingly relied on digital to manage their lives, including purchasing products. Amazon’s Advertising service saw a 44-percent increase in revenue (advertising is included in the “other” category in Amazon’s earnings). Why did Amazon’s advertising business do so well?

  • For one thing, consumers on Amazon are searching with intent to buy. And a lot of people are searching on Amazon. According to CivicScience, 49 percent of product searches start on Amazon, versus 22 percent on Google.
  • Amazon without question became a more attractive place to find things to buy as shelter-in-place mandates took hold. According to Learnbonds.com, Amazon’s monthly unique visitors for March, 4.6 billion, easily exceeded competitors such as eBay and Walmart.
  • Amazon was prepared to help advertisers build their visibility during the surge. As we have reported on our blog, over the years, Amazon’s advertising service has developed a number of products that have served Amazon and advertisers well. Those products include Sponsored Ads, Video Ads, and Display Ads, among others.

Amazon said it will plow its profits into COVID-19-related relief activities. As CEO Jeff Bezos said in a statement, “If you’re a shareowner in Amazon, you may want to take a seat, because we’re not thinking small. Under normal circumstances, in this coming Q2, we’d expect to make some $4 billion or more in operating profit. But these aren’t normal circumstances. Instead, we expect to spend the entirety of that $4 billion, and perhaps a bit more, on COVID-related expenses getting products to customers and keeping employees safe.”

Amazon’s steady development of an advertising service helped put the company in the position to be able to accommodate this expenditure.

Facebook and Google: Signs of a Turnaround

To no one’s surprise, both Facebook and Google saw a slowdown in revenue earned from online advertising, especially in March. But stock shares for both companies rose after they announced earnings. Why? Let’s take a closer look.

Facebook: More Users and Engagement

Facebook announced that even though ad revenue had dropped during the quarter, it was showing signs of turning around in April. Overall, quarterly revenue rose by $17.74 billion. As Facebook said in a statement, “After the initial steep decrease in advertising revenue in March, we have seen signs of stability reflected in the first three weeks of April.”

In addition, Facebook said that monthly active users had increased 10 percent year over year to number 2.6 billion, and engagement was up as people sheltering in place increased their use of social media.

The advertisers who maintained their spending levels during the dip in March benefitted by being present during the surge in user engagement, as we discussed on our blog.

Google: YouTube Is the Star

Meanwhile, Google’s parent company, Alphabet, reported quarterly revenue of $41.16 billion, a 13-percent year-over-year increase. Revenue from advertising rose 11.6 percent, with advertising from YouTube surging by 33.5 percent.

Alphabet acknowledged that online ad revenue had taken a hit because of COVID-19. But in an investor earnings call, the company’s Chief Financial Officer, Ruth Porat, said that “We have seen some very early signs of recovery in commercial search behavior by users.”

Because Google is very active in the travel and retail – industries that have been rocked by the pandemic – its performance actually exceeded expectations.

As with Facebook, advertisers who maintained their levels of spending benefitted as the general population shifted its behaviors online during the first quarter. As we noted on our blog, many businesses adapted their tone and content to demonstrate empathy with ads running on Google sites such as YouTube. Those businesses positioned themselves well.

What You Should Do 

Amazon, Facebook, and Google will continue to dominate the world of online advertising for the foreseeable future. Here is what we suggest:

  • Don’t go dark. Businesses that maintained their visibility online during the March advertising downturn benefitted from the increase in online engagement. Even as states ease up their shelter-in-place orders, social distancing is not going away anytime soon. We’re living in a digital-first world now amid longer-term behavioral changes. Being present with paid media means taking a digital-first approach.
  • Mind your tone. As I blogged in March, businesses need to do a gut check on the tone of their content. Many businesses have successfully incorporated empathy into their advertising while others have changed their messaging to focus on health and safety. Taylor Hart shared some examples of successful social media advertising in this blog post.
  • Be open to different forms of engagement. It’s important that businesses be ready to adapt different forms of engagement to reflect changing user behavior. For instance, as Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg pointed out during Facebook’s earnings call, livestreaming on Facebook is a more attractive alternative to live events. Moreover, Facebook had already been seeing a marked increase in use of its Messenger app before the pandemic. Héctor Ariza recently shared examples of ad products that capitalize on the popularity of Messenger. Given the increase in Facebook’s monthly average users, now is a good time to try those products.
  • Capitalize on new ad products. Google is fighting hard to protect its turf amid the rise of Amazon Advertising. The company continues to roll out new products to make the Google universe more appealing to advertisers. For instance, I recently blogged about how Google has adapted the YouTube masthead ad format for the era of connected TV. As Mark Smith discussed in December 2019, Google has been developing some impressive location-based advertising tools.

Contact True Interactive

We know how to create and manage online advertising that is appropriate for the times we are living in — don’t hesitate to reach out. We can help.

 

How Brands Are Succeeding with Social Media Advertising

How Brands Are Succeeding with Social Media Advertising

Advertising

There’s a disconnect between how businesses and consumers are behaving on social media during the coronavirus pandemic. As reported in The Wall Street Journal, people are spending more time on social apps such as Facebook, but businesses have scaled back their advertising during the first quarter (although in its latest earnings announcement, Facebook said that ad revenue had stabilized at the beginning of the second quarter in April). Companies that go dark on social create an opportunity for their competitors to engage with a growing audience. If you are one of those brands thinking of scaling back, perhaps you should reconsider. Let’s take a closer look at what’s going on.

Consumers Are Online. And They Are Receptive to Ads.

Life under lockdown has resulted in a spike of internet usage. The latest report from App Annie indicates that worldwide, average weekly time spent in games and apps on Android devices increased 20 percent year-over-year in Q1 2020. Significantly, consumer spending also ticked up: “In Q1 2020 consumers spent over $23.4B through the app stores, the largest quarter ever in terms of consumer spend.”

Increased time online also means an uptick in social media usage. According to TechCrunch, an April 2020 Kantar report reveals the extent of this uptick during the pandemic: Facebook, WhatsApp, and Instagram experienced a 40 percent+ increase in usage. Facebook usage has increased by 37 percent overall.

Not only are consumers online more, and still spending, but they are open to seeing ads. GlobalWebIndex research reveals that globally, approximately 50 percent of respondents approve of brands running “normal” advertising campaigns not linked to COVID-19. Strongest approval was reserved for businesses offering practical and informative tips to deal with the current circumstances.

As reported in Social Media Today, a recent Twitter survey provides some context as to this consumer openness to ads. One interesting finding: 52 percent of respondents said that seeing/hearing ads provides a sense of normalcy, even comfort. In other words, regular promotions are familiar. Anything familiar right now is welcome.

Brands That Are Doing It Right 

As we’ve already blogged, companies like Ford, Hanes, and Budweiser have all managed to strike the right tone in their coronavirus-era advertising. Brands that are specifically advertising on social media, and doing it well, include:

  • TOMS: in a recent Instagram ad, the shoe manufacturer acknowledges the fact that one’s workplace might look a little different right now. “Working from home?” the ad asks, over an image of cozy slippers from TOMS. The implication here is that times may be different, but TOMS shoes, familiar and comfortable, can help make these unfamiliar times better.

  • Dial: at a time when the CDC is recommending handwashing as a safety measure, antibacterial soap manufacturer Dial has created a 10-second spot for Facebook and Instagram that focuses on how to wash hands thoroughly. Dial’s name bookends the ad at beginning and end, but the focus is on customer safety. That’s a sound approach, given GlobalWebIndex research revealing 80 percent of respondents approve of brands running campaigns which demonstrate how they are helping their customers.

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The CDC recommends washing your hands as one of the best ways to help prevent you and your family from getting sick. Follow these 5 steps to wash your hands the right way every time:⁣ ⁣ Wet your hands with clean, running water (warm or cold), turn off the tap, and apply soap.⁣ ⁣ Lather your hands by rubbing them together with the soap. Lather the backs of your hands, between your fingers, and under your nails.⁣ ⁣ Scrub your hands for at least 20 seconds. Need a timer? Hum the “Happy Birthday” song from beginning to end twice.⁣ ⁣ Rinse your hands under clean, running water. ⁣ ⁣ Dry your hands using a clean towel or air dry them.⁣ ⁣ #Dial⁣ ⁣ #WashYourHands⁣ ⁣ #DialUpProtection

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  • Bones Coffee Company: in an Instagram spot that includes a coupon code, Bones Coffee Company encourages consumer engagement while speaking to our current quarantine situation head on. “How to self-quarantine,” the coffee company muses. “1. Stay Home. 2. Get Coffee.” The message is short, sweet, and to the point: small pleasures are still in our reach. They’re just enjoyed at home right now.

Tone Is Key

Brands do need to tread carefully to build trust. As reported in eMarketer, a March 2020 Kantar survey finds 75 percent of respondents saying businesses “should not exploit [the] coronavirus situation to promote the brand,” and that brands need to be careful with their tone. The Dial ad works because Dial is sharing useful information. The TOMS and Bones Coffee Company ads work because they discuss products that people would naturally want to use at home. Although the TOMS and Bones Coffee Company ads strike a lighter tone, they fall short of outright humor, which would have made them potentially tone deaf.

In short, not all ads work in a COVID-19 world. It’s also important to remember who your audience is: age group and quarantine status are bound to shape what that audience wants to hear.

Contact True Interactive

Do you need help making decisions about advertising on social? Contact us.

How Higher Education Can Adapt Digital Marketing Approaches

How Higher Education Can Adapt Digital Marketing Approaches

Marketing

COVID-19 has affected businesses across every vertical in different ways. Some are finding it nearly impossible to keep up with the demand for staple goods such as toilet paper and health-related products such as hand sanitizers and face masks. Others, ranging from hotels to restaurants, are struggling to find ways to keep employees on the payroll. The higher education industry is being affected as well. Let’s take a closer look based on our observations and client work.

Challenges for Higher Education

This pandemic has created several challenges for the higher education industry – some for which many were prepared for, and others which have left colleges and universities scrambling to adapt. Many of our higher education clients have robust online class offerings. In fact, many offer bachelor’s and master’s degrees that are 100 percent online. Those clients have experienced minimal disruption to their class schedules.

With that said, when we dig deeper into the data and examine marketing trends closely, we see some revealing details, such as:

  • When it comes graduate-level healthcare related degrees, we have seen a steep drop in overall demand (impressions and clicks are down significantly in Google) as well as a reduction in the number of people completing lead forms seeking more information about a degree program. These results are not surprising. We have all witnessed the heroic efforts of our healthcare workers over the past weeks, devoting countless hours to the point of exhaustion. They understandably need to put the rest of their lives on hold.
  • Conversely, we have seen a 5 percent lift in conversion rates from February to April for master’s in education programs offered by our higher education clients. Those programs are for people who possess education degrees and are looking to earn an advanced degree such as a master’s in education or a master’s in early childhood education. As K-12 classrooms around the country have turned to an abbreviated school day utilizing virtual learning, teachers are reclaiming a few extra hours of their day, and appear to be spending time looking for opportunities to further their own education and advance their careers.

Because of the vast difference in conversion rates between higher education degree programs, it is important to tailor your marketing approach. Now may be a great time to ramp up pay-per-click (PPC) spend for graduate-level teaching degrees, while pulling back on PPC spend for healthcare degrees.

Why Higher Education Needs to Stay Engaged Online

Although higher education is in a unique position with many already offering online learning prior to the pandemic, clearly there is still much disruption in campus programs. Colleges are struggling to complete the 2019-20 year in a virtual format. Many are offering pass/fail options versus a standard letter grade. There are virtual graduation ceremonies in the works,  and some are choosing to delay graduation until a later date in hopes there can be an in-person ceremony.

And a bigger question looms: will campuses will open on schedule this fall, and if they do, how many students will feel comfortable returning? This USA Today article speaks to the conflict being reported widely throughout the news media: students and their parents are going to be tempted take the 2020-21 school year off rather than return to an online format, especially if colleges and universities charge normal tuition rates for an online experience.

In this uncertain climate, all higher education providers must use digital to stay closely connected to current and prospective students as well as their parents. Doing so is especially important now as colleges and universities try to attract students to an experience that is radically different than the one that students signed up for. Right now, many schools are wisely investing more dollars in social platforms to keep students in isolation engaged during the 2019-20 year. They will need to do even more as the uncertain 2020-21 year approaches.

Be Ready to Pivot

Amid uncertainty, we are sure to see online learning play an even bigger role in higher education. Colleges and universities need to be ready to tackle the challenge. Competition is already strong resulting in high cost-per-clicks (CPCs). Currently we have seen CPCs range as high as $90 or more. As more and more colleges enter the online market, we should expect to see those CPCs increase further, and smaller colleges with limited budgets may be forced out by bigger players.

Contact True Interactive

It will become increasingly important to take full advantage of targeting options including geographic, household income, age, and interests to help make the most of your advertising dollars. The one-size-fits-all approach will quickly lead to failure. At True Interactive, we have extensive experience in the higher education field. We are happy to review your current marketing plan and work with you to ensure you are on the path to success. Contact us to get started.

Photo by Matt Ragland on Unsplash

How to Adapt B2B Marketing during Turbulent Times

How to Adapt B2B Marketing during Turbulent Times

Marketing

Businesses that market to other business can and should keep engaging with their clients and prospects during the disruption we’re all enduring right now. Let’s take a look at why this is so and how a B2B brand should stay visible.

The B2B Customer Journey Is More Complex

The B2B customer journey is more complex, and the sales cycle is lengthier. The decision-making process for purchasing a product or service for a business requires more research and approvals. So in a B2B setting, it’s even more important for a brand to maintain frequent outreach to stay on a prospect’s radar screen. During a disruption of operations, your prospects may postpone their decisions, thus making the sales cycle even longer. But if you fall off their radar screens, it’s going to be harder for you to re-connect with them when they are ready to re-engage.

What You Should Do

So what should you do to remain engaged? Here are a few tips:

1 Examine Your Analytics

Your B2B customer is just like a B2C audience: likely stuck at home during a period of social distancing (unless their profession dictates otherwise) doing their jobs exclusively online. We’re seeing dramatic shifts in both desktop and mobile search behavior across the board while people practice social distancing. Now, dig deeper into your own audience behavior. For instance:

  • What changes do you see in click-through rates for different paid media campaigns you’ve been running and at what time of day? They’ve probably changed depending on the type of product you offer.
  • What changes do you see in the content your prospects are searching for?
  • Where is your audience spending your time? It’s quite possible they are engaging more on social than they ever have while they combine professional and personal priorities while they work at home. A social platform such as Facebook, which might not have been your natural choice to advertise, might make more sense right now.
  • In addition, if you are a global B2B brand, your mileage may vary depending on where you do business, as different countries are being affected by the COVID-19 pandemic with varying degrees of severity and with different recovery time frames.

2 Be Ready to Adapt Your Tactics

Depending on what your data tells you, be ready to adapt the nature of your campaigns, for instance:

  • Adapt your keyword strategy to be more in tune with the topics they are looking for right now. Carefully manage your keyword exclusions to avoid having your name appear next to COVID-19 content.
  • Be prepared to invest more into paid social media if your audience is navigating there. In addition, consider that Facebook’s and LinkedIn’s audience targeting tools make them ideal for experimenting with the type of audience segments you want to reach.

3 Mind Your Tone

B2B audiences are experiencing the same feelings of doubt and uncertainty that B2C audiences are. Re-examine the tone of your content. Be prepared to tone down overly salesy, chipper content that will come across as tone deaf. Use phrases and images that emphasize that you are here for your customer and seek to partner with them during a difficult time.

4 Invest in Thought Leadership

Sharing thought leadership (such as blog posts and white papers) is a great way to augment your digital advertising with top-of-the-funnel awareness. Why? Because during a slowdown in operations, it is not uncommon for B2B customers to brush up on professional knowledge, and they’re also going to be more receptive to practical ideas for managing their businesses during trying times.

Contact True Interactive

True Interactive knows how to create and execute digital marketing for both business-to-consumer and business-to-business clients. We’re here to help you. Contact us to learn more.

Image by Gerd Altmann from Pixabay