Coming to the Amazon App: Video Ads

Coming to the Amazon App: Video Ads

Amazon

As consumers increasingly shop online, Amazon’s app is a popular go-to destination, and the company is clearly paying heed. Recent Mobile Marketer and Bloomberg articles underscore Amazon’s sensitivity to consumer habits and the way the company is responding to what it sees: for example, by testing video ads in the Apple iOS version of Amazon’s shopping app. The move makes Amazon a stronger advertising alternative to Google and Facebook, and signals not only the e-commerce giant’s increased focus on advertising, but also its recognition of the public’s hunger for mobile ads.

Savvy and Lucrative

Incorporating video ads on the Amazon app is a savvy move. As an intent-based app, Amazon tends to draw consumers who already possess a desire to buy. The video spots, which pop up in response to users’ search results in Amazon’s shopping app, are meant to capitalize on this intention. It’s also a lucrative move for the company: though prices range depending on the ad category and not everyone pays a fixed rate, Amazon is charging roughly a $35,000 ad budget to run the spots at five cents per view for 60 days. The plan is to start with iOS, then expand to Google’s Android mobile operating system later this year.

Growing Along with Digital Advertising

As we’ve been discussing at True Interactive, the news is a sign of Amazon’s continued growth as a platform for businesses to advertise on—not just sell products on. And although Amazon’s April 25th first quarter earnings announcement reports a slowdown in that growth, the announcement also makes it clear: Amazon’s advertising business remains strong and highly profitable.

Furthermore, Amazon is making inroads into others’ share of the spoils. eMarketer reports that Amazon’s advertising business will capture 8.8 percent of U.S. digital ad spending in 2019, eating into the percentage enjoyed by the duopoly of Google and Facebook (Google, while still enjoying the lion’s share of digital ad spending, is projected to drop by one point in 2019). And Amazon, though still trailing behind Facebook and Google in advertising spend share, seems uniquely positioned to step up. As eMarketer forecasting director Monica Peart notes, “Amazon offers a major benefit to advertisers, especially CPG and direct-to-consumer [D2C] brands. The platform is rich with shoppers’ behavioral data for targeting and provides access to purchase data in real time.”

It’s a good time for Amazon to expand in this way: as we discussed in a recent post, mobile ads are on the rise. Forrester reports that between 2017 and 2022, mobile will drive 86 percent of growth in U.S. digital ad spending. The digital dollars are being siphoned from other, more traditional ad spending shares, according to eMarketer: directories like the Yellow Pages, for example, and traditional print resources like newspapers and magazines. “The steady shift of consumer attention to digital platforms has hit an inflection point with advertisers, forcing them to now turn to digital to seek the incremental gains in reach and revenues which are disappearing in traditional media advertising,” Peart said.

What You Can Do

Whether or not you advertise on Amazon, the news offers a compelling reason to have a mobile ad strategy. We recommend that you:

  • Remember that mobile is its own beast. Take a page from Amazon’s book: listen to the signals of consumer behavior and shape your mobile advertising accordingly.
  • Watch for Facebook and Google to respond with more mobile ad products, and see how they do it. Watching these giants maneuver and attempt to one-up one another can be a great way to learn what works.
  • Consider how video plays into your advertising mix. Video has its own set of requirements for production and creative concepting: what does that mean for your business and the resources you have at hand?

True Interactive works with businesses all the time to develop their video advertising campaigns Call us, and see our recently published case study with Snapfish, to get an idea of the kind of work we do.

Photo by You X Ventures on Unsplash

 

 

 

 

Why the Launch of Microsoft Advertising Is Good for Brands

Why the Launch of Microsoft Advertising Is Good for Brands

Bing

For many businesses, the discussion about online advertising platforms begins and ends with Amazon Advertising, Facebook, and Google. But recently Microsoft stated the case for why it belongs in the same conversation. On April 29, Microsoft announced that its Bing Ads product has been rebranded as Microsoft Advertising. The announcement was more than a name change. Rather, Microsoft reminded advertisers that there’s a lot more to Bing than paid search.

Bing: More Than Search

Bing is already a platform for businesses to launch digital advertising in a number of ways. For example, as we blogged last year, Bing has been rolling out a feature that makes it possible for businesses to target Bing advertisements by relying on LinkedIn data. The feature, known as LinkedIn profile targeting, is an example of how Microsoft is monetizing LinkedIn a few years after Microsoft purchased the popular business-to-business platform. In addition, Bing is piloting a number of products, such as these audience marketing products:

  • In-Market Audiences: targets curated user lists determined to be in market for a particular purchase category.
  • Product Audiences for Search: businesses get remarketing lists for products that allow them to target searchers based on product IDs they interacted with – and promote those same product IDs to them.
  • Microsoft Audience Ads: Audience Campaigns: you can manage your audience budget, campaigns, and optimization separately from your Bing Ads search campaigns.
  • Similar Audiences: targets audiences that are similar to your remarketing audiences.

Bing Advantages

Many advertisers aren’t aware of these and many other Microsoft ad products. But they should. As I blogged last year, Bing offers many advantages. For instance:

  • At True Interactive, we have seen larger average order values on Bing compared to Google. In other words, the typical consumer on Bing spends more per purchase. That’s because the average Bing searcher probably has a higher income level than the average Google user.
  • Bing innovates in more ways than the brand gets credit for, such as its use of visual content. The recently launched Bing visual search extends a strong visual search capability across both Android and iOS devices, whereas visual search on Google remains limited to the Android world.
  • Bing is building a stronger network of partners. As noted earlier this year, Bing is the exclusive provider of search advertising across Verizon Media properties such as Yahoo.

Microsoft used the news about Microsoft Advertising to draw attention to the launch of more advertising products. For instance, the new Sponsored Products (available exclusively in the United States) helps manufacturers to boost visibility and drive more traffic for their top products in shopping campaigns. As Microsoft noted,

With this new capability, our clients can achieve better alignment of marketing efforts between manufacturers and retailers. Together, the connections they create with shoppers work harder to drive performance — clicks, conversions, and ROI. Manufacturers gain access to new reporting and optimization capabilities, and retailers get additional product marketing support with a fair cost split.

Microsoft wants the rebrand to do for Microsoft what the launch of Amazon Advertising achieved for Amazon and the rebrand of Google AdWords to Google Ads did for Google: raise awareness for a broader portfolio of products.

Why the Rebrand Is Good

I believe that the expansion of ad products under the Microsoft brand is good for advertisers for these reasons:

  • Businesses have more options beyond the Big Three of Amazon, Facebook, and Google.
  • Stronger competition will lead to innovation with product development.
  • As I noted, Microsoft delivers a valuable audience, more so than many businesses know.

At True Interactive, we work with businesses to develop successful campaigns across all these platforms and more. Contact us to learn how we can help you succeed.

Advertiser Q&A: What Is a Micro-influencer?

Advertiser Q&A: What Is a Micro-influencer?

Social media

As we discussed in a recent blog post, celebrities are not the only game in town when brands want to include influencers in their advertising campaigns. Micro-influencers are also useful and usually less expensive. Increasingly, our clients are reaching out with questions about them. We thought we’d take a moment to answer some of those questions—and help clarify who these micro-influencers are and why they are important.

What is a micro-influencer?

A micro-influencer is someone who commands a smaller audience — anywhere from 2,000 to about 50,000 followers— on a social media channel like Facebook or Instagram.

Micro-influencers tend to be everyday people (as opposed to celebrities). But they know a lot about a specific topic. That expertise inspires loyalty in their community of followers, who look to them for recommendations, likes, and dislikes.

Take The Brothers Buoy: Brooklyn-based Jackson (who writes the copy) and Graham (who shoots the photos) have taken it upon themselves to turn people on to good places to eat in New York and beyond. Their sass and humor have earned them about 8,000 followers, along with some healthy respect (e.g., they’ve worked with Condé Nast Traveler).

Why do micro-influencers matter?

In short, they have street cred (see the Condé Nast Traveler reference, above). And micro-influencers tend to enjoy high levels of engagement. They may not be breaking records in terms of the size of their audience, but the followers they do have really love them and interact, a lot.

In fact, a smaller following makes it possible for micro-influencers to maintain a personal connection with their fans: as Adweek reported, engagement usually dips the more followers an influencer attracts. Perhaps because of the high levels of engagement, micro-influencers project an authenticity—and inspire a level of trust—that is sometimes hard for celebrity influencers to sustain.

Another bonus: micro-influencers tend to be less expensive for businesses working on a budget, and may give a business more bang for its buck. Smart Insights notes that micro-influencers are 6.7 percent more cost effective than their higher-profile colleagues. And as IZEA points out, a business might reach more people working with several micro-influencers who charge less but enjoy a powerful connection with loyal followers, as an alternative to maxing out the entire budget on a single post from one celebrity influencer.

What are some tips for working with micro-influencers?

  • First identify the goals for your campaign, then begin researching potential micro-influencers. Influencers have different personalities and communication styles; look for someone who feels like a good fit. Consider factors such as their audience and how the influencer connects with that audience. Are their tone and approach suitable for your own brand?
  • Once you’ve found an influencer who seems like a good match, establish a connection. Follow them on their social channels, leave comments, and engage meaningfully before reaching out about a collaboration.
  • When you do reach out, contact the micro-influencer via their direct email, and demonstrate that you are indeed familiar with their work—and a fan. Since you’ve already established a connection, that familiarity, not to mention the admiration, will likely come naturally.
  • Finally, don’t micromanage the micro-influencer. Remember, one reason micro-influencers are popular is because their audiences trust them to be real. Feeding micro-influencers lines or opinions defeats the purpose of the collaboration—and can backfire if followers suspect inauthentic content.

Interested in learning more about micro-influencers and how a collaboration might benefit your business? Contact True Interactive.

Advertiser Q&A: Ad Customizers

Advertiser Q&A: Ad Customizers

Advertising Google

An ad customizer is an incredibly helpful tool that makes it possible for a business to make fine adjustments to an ad while the ad is still live.  The Google ad customizer is especially useful. But many businesses are not aware of the ad customizer and how it can help them. Let’s take a closer look.

1 What is an ad customizer?

An ad customizer is a feed that allows you to make changes to your ad copy while keeping that ad running 24/7. Put another way, an ad customizer makes it possible for you to make changes on the fly using a feed of business data that you swap as needed.

For example, let’s say you are a retailer running search ads for a throw blanket. Furthermore, let’s assume you need to change your ad frequently – running a 30-percent off price deal one week; then stopping the 30-percent off deal for a few weeks; and then running a 25-percent off promotion for another week depending on seasonal demand.  With an ad customizer, you can update your add accordingly in your feed while running the ad instead of having to take the ad down and create an entirely new promotion.

2 Does ad customizer work only for retail?

Any business can use ad customizer. For example, a service-area business such as a plumber or lawncare service might use an ad customizer to adapt a promotion by different zip codes in a particular city or region. A business might want to do so for a number of reasons, such as noticing an uptick in searches for plumbers or lawncare services in a particular zip code.

3 What are the benefits of using an ad customizer?

Using an ad customizer keeps your costs per click (CPC) steady. That’s because you don’t need to re-load an entirely new advertisement, which would affect your CPC. In addition, an ad customizer, when used well, can increase your click-through rate by making your content more targeted.

4 Is there a downside to using an ad customizer?

Using an ad customizer could result in an increase in CPC, but you’ll enjoy a better click-through rate, which is especially beneficial for seasonal ads or flash sales.

If you’re interested in using an ad customizer and need help, please reach out to us at True Interactive. We help businesses maximize the value of their online advertising.

Photo by Marvin Meyer on Unsplash

3D for Brands: No Longer a Novelty

3D for Brands: No Longer a Novelty

Advertising

3D is no longer a novelty. It’s becoming a way for businesses to share both advertisements and organic content. Case in point: Bing Ads recently teamed with Samsung to create 3D advertisements that display when consumers search for Samsung Galaxy devices on the Bing search engine.

Here’s how it works: an option for a 3D ad appears when an individual (using Bing) searches for the Samsung Galaxy S10 or S9 on their desktop. The ad, which expands to full screen size, can be manipulated by rotating the image, or zooming in on it. But it’s more than a zoom. Consumers see every aspect of the Samsung device plainly, from multiple angles, and can click on an image to access product details.

As Ravleen Beeston, UK head of sales for Microsoft Search Advertising, said in a statement to Netimperative, “These new 3D ads, unique to Bing, herald a new era of search advertising when it comes to displaying products through desktop search since they complement and enhance the experience for consumers looking to engage with a product.”

3D on Facebook

In addition, Facebook has made it possible for both businesses and consumers to post 3D photos, which makes organic content really pop. As discussed in this Digiday article, the 3D photos are “inherently thumb stopping.” If long-form video is showing a decline in effectiveness as attention spans likewise decline, 3D photos promise to be the next frontier. And brands are jumping at the chance to engage consumers in a fresh way. 3D can be especially useful for retailers trying to showcase products that require close inspection—expensive cellphones, for example, or even food. Food delivery service Bite Squad, for one, has capitalized on the opportunity by posting 3D photos, including one of BBQ from Famous Dave’s. “My goal is to catch your eyes as you [are] scrolling your feed,” Craig Key, CMO of Bite Squad, said, adding that just the sudden movement of an image can be a reason for users to scroll back up.

What You Should Do

At True Interactive, we recommend that you constantly look for ways to incorporate technology such as 3D if they are appropriate for your business:

  • Understand how 3D might add value to your paid and organic content. Don’t be gimmicky about using 3D. Have a specific goal in mind, such as increasing engagement with your ads, especially for products that require high levels of consideration.
  • Be aware of companies such as ThreeKit that provide technologies to help you design advertisements in 3D.
  • Work with an agency partner such as True Interactive that knows how to incorporate formats such as 3D into a larger advertising campaign.

Interested in exploring the opportunities inherent in 3D? Call us.

Google Makes Ads More Shoppable

Google Makes Ads More Shoppable

Google

Google understands the power of images. To remain competitive with visual platforms such as Pinterest and Instagram, Google is introducing a feature called shoppable ads on Google Images. With this new format, shopping online through image search just became easier than ever.

Shoppable Ads

According to Google’s blog, half of online shoppers say that images of a product inspire them to make a purchase. And Google has responded to that input with shoppable ads on Google Images. The format, which allows advertisers to highlight multiple products for sale within a sponsored ad appearing in Google Images results, is currently being tested with select retailers.

The format works as follows:

  • A shopper searching for, say, home office ideas on their desktop or mobile device, can pull up a series of sponsored ads in Google Images.
  • Retailers have the ability to tag several products in an ad.=
  • When the consumer scrolls through these ads, they can hover over items for sale in any given image and learn specific details—like price and brand—about those items.

Being There for the Consumer

The new development is significant. By making it easier to make purchases using the power of visual search, Google demonstrates a real understanding of how consumers shop. According to Adweek, it also makes Google competitive in an arena in which Pinterest and Instagram are making headway. (On Pinterest alone, people conduct hundreds of millions of visual searches monthly.) As Daniel Alegre, president, retail shopping and payments at Google, said during a keynote at the retail conference Shoptalk, “No journey is exactly alike. With so many choices and awareness, awareness is about being there when the consumer is looking for you.”

For more information about how to use images in your online advertising, contact True Interactive.

Image source: https://www.searchenginejournal.com/google-introduces-shoppable-ads-on-google-images/296551/

 

 

How Snapfish Capitalizes on the Power of Mobile Ads

How Snapfish Capitalizes on the Power of Mobile Ads

Advertising

How do you get a 756-percent return on ad spend? Our new case study about the work we performed for Snapfish will show you. We worked with Snapfish to create ads geared toward mobile over a one-year period. Goals included increasing:

  • Awareness and downloads of the Snapfish app.
  • Purchases via the app.

The campaign reaped major results, such as a 343 increase in revenue from mobile app installs and a 756-percent return on ad spend. Our case study provides even more details.

Mobile Ads Are on the Rise

This work is significant because mobile ads are on the rise. According to a recent Forrester report, between 2017 and 2022 mobile will drive 86 percent of growth in U.S. digital ad spending. In other words, mobile is really drawing the lion’s share of all online advertising.

Mobile Is Its Own Beast

But because of the way people engage with mobile ads, you need to understand how to do mobile right. As Mobile Marketing Association (MMA) research points out, the human brain takes less than half a second to connect with a mobile ad on an emotional level. In MMA’s Cognition Neuroscience Research project, approximately 900 individuals participated in a study in which eye-tracking and EEG monitoring were used to measure what consumers saw—and how they reacted. It took 400 milliseconds on average for consumers to see and react either positively or negatively to 67 percent of the mobile ads they saw. That’s a much faster response than that to ads shown on a desktop.

Mobile ads need to be designed in a format that captures the attention of consumers within 400 milliseconds! It’s imperative for marketers to understand the impact of mobile ads in the first second. We know how to do it right, as our new case study shows. Contact us.