Why Amazon and Facebook Are Catching up to Google

Why Amazon and Facebook Are Catching up to Google

Advertising Amazon Facebook Google

The race to lead the online advertising market is getting tighter. According to a new report from eMarketer, Amazon Advertising and Facebook are catching up to Google’s share of the online advertising market. Let’s take a closer look.

What eMarketer Reported

eMarketer says that in 2020:

  • Amazon’s share of the online advertising market increased from 7.8 percent in 2019 to 10 percent in 2020.
  • Facebook’s share increased from 23.6 percent to 25.2 percent.
  • Google’s leading share dropped from 31.6 percent to 28.9 percent.

To put this data in perspective, eMarketer says Google’s share of online advertising was 38.6 percent in 2017.

What Does the Marketer Data Mean?

  • Amazon Advertising is only going to get bigger. That’s because Amazon delivers advertisers insight on its vast customer base – and not just casual searchers, but people searching with intent and making purchases. Per eMarketer, Amazon is enjoying growth across the board — search revenues from Sponsored Products and Sponsored Brands, and video ad revenues on properties including Amazon Fire TV, Twitch, and IMDb TV. It’s worth noting that Amazon’s growth is coming not just from ads on Amazon.com but from the Amazon network, as noted (e.g., Twitch and IMDb). That means Amazon is figuring how to use data about its customer base to expand its ad services across the web. In addition, as we noted on our blog recently, Google’s crackdown on third-party cookies is favorable to companies such as Amazon that know how to sell ads based on their massive inventories of first-party cookie data.
  • Facebook and Google are doing just fine. Despite Google’s drop in market share, the company generated a whopping $147 billion in ad revenue in 2020. Google saw a dip in its ad revenue in 2020 because its travel advertisers were hit hard by COVID-19, but the company came roaring back in the back half of the year. Google’s ad revenue actually increased by 9 percent year over year. The decrease in Google’s market share may actually help the company combat multiple anti-trust lawsuits at the state and federal level. Meanwhile, Facebook continues to reap the benefits of being the world’s largest and dominant social media network. Despite numerous controversies, Facebook enjoyed advertising growth in 2020. An increase in its user base has played an important role. That growth spiked owing to the massive uptake of social media that occurred during COVID-19, but Facebook’s user base has been climbing for years. Simply put: there is a disconnect between news media criticisms of Facebook and the behavior of its user base.

What Advertisers Should Do

  • First, follow your audience. Make your advertising investments based on the journey your own customers are making. Most customers rely on multiple digital touchpoints on their way from awareness to purchase. It’s likely that no single ad platform will (or should) dominate your spend. Incorporating Amazon, Facebook, and Google into your ad spend is probably not going to be an either/or choice (more about that on our blog).
  • Do your homework. The ad giants are going to launch more ad tools as the market place becomes more competitive. Amazon recently launched Amazon Live, which makes it possible for retailers to use livestreams to sell products – part of the live commerce trend we blogged about recently. In addition, up-and-comers such as Walmart Connect and Macy’s will launch more ad products as they capitalize on their own first-party data to generate more ad revenue.

Contact True Interactive

At True Interactive, we’ve been helping businesses succeed through online advertising for many years. Our services span Google, Facebook, Amazon Advertising, and much more. Contact us to learn how we can help you.

 

Why Macy’s Launched an Online Advertising Platform

Why Macy’s Launched an Online Advertising Platform

Advertising

Macy’s is capitalizing on a big-time trend in online advertising. The retailer recently discussed with investors the growth of an in-house online media network that sells ads to brands. The Macy’s Media Network, launched in August 2020, has already generated $35 million in revenue. The growth of the network underscores how big retailers are becoming advertising partners.

The Macy’s Media Network

Here’s how the network works:

  • An in-house Macy’s team offers advertisers digital formats like sponsored product, website display, and physical media ads.
  • Macy’s draws on all the data it has accumulated about Macy’s customers (including customer behavior data from the Macy’s website – known as first-party data) to ensure that the above ad formats target customers based on their shopping habits. As Macy’s says on its website, “We connect our shoppers to your brands through a wide range of advertising services. And it’s all driven by data . . . First-party data helps us find your perfect audience, whether it be on or off our site.”
  • The above ads appear on the Macy’s website or off it.
  • Macy’s describes its audience as “Fashion-focused customers who LOVE to shop.”

If the above approach already sounds familiar to you — well, it should. Macy’s is following a model that Amazon has already mastered via Amazon Advertising and that Walmart is developing with Walmart Connect. In addition, retailers ranging from Kroger to Target are building their own networks in an attempt to put their own first-party data to work and generate more revenue streams in a digital-first world. The two clear leaders are:

  • Walmart Connect. Walmart is just beginning to flex its muscle to provide advertising products that are similar to Amazon’s. What makes Walmart Connect stand apart is the way Walmart can also tap into shopping purchase behavior inside Walmart stores.

Why would Macy’s enter a market that is already becoming crowded? Because Macy’s, like any retailer with an ad platform, has something no one else has: its own first-party data. The data that Macy’s collects about its own customers gives potential insights into a targeted audience consisting of shoppers who are especially interested in beauty and fashion.

Here is what we believe will happen with retailer-based ad networks:

  • They will proliferate. Retailers are under tremendous pressure to improve their margins. As more shopping behavior shifts online, it makes sense to wrest more value from their customer data.
  • They will become more specialized. Macy’s, for instance, is focused on fashion and beauty customers. Consider how many other retailers could build up ad networks. Best Buy could offer services for advertisers wanting to reach consumers of high-tech consumer products, for example.

What Advertisers Should Do

We suggest that advertisers:

  • Consider retailer-based ad networks as a complement to your existing digital ad strategy, not as a replacement. If your strategy focuses on Facebook and Google, for instance, don’t move your ad dollars over to a retailer network. Remember that Facebook and Google also already offer proven advertising products that capitalize on their vast user base. For example, location-based digital advertising tools help strengthen Google’s advertising services at the local level.
  • Learn more about the ad products that might apply to you – and those products are evolving. For instance, Amazon recently launched Amazon Live, which makes it possible for retailers to use livestreams to sell products – part of the live commerce trend we blogged about recently. But if live commerce is not your cup of tea, ad products such as Display and Sponsored Brands may be more appealing.

Meanwhile, Macy’s expects more growth for its own ad platform. In a recent call with investors, Jeff Gennette, Macy’s chair and chief executive officer, told investors, “Looking ahead, we see a lot of promise in our ability to expand our monetization engine, while cultivating greater customer engagement with more relevant and personalized content and offers.”

Contact True Interactive

To succeed with online advertising, contact True Interactive. Read about some of our client work here.

Social Commerce Is on the Rise

Social Commerce Is on the Rise

Advertising

Social commerce is on the rise. According to a new report from eMarketer, the pandemic has fueled a surge in e-commerce across the board, and social commerce in the U.S. has benefitted from that acceleration. By all accounts, it will continue to do so: the prediction is that social commerce will gain even more traction as platforms boost their checkout and shopping functions. What does this news mean for your brand? Read on to learn more.

The Market Is Growing

Social commerce is certainly enjoying a banner year already. eMarketer predicts that in 2021, U.S. retail social commerce sales will rise to $36.09 billion — a whopping 34.8 percent leap that would represent a 4.3 percent piece of the retail ecommerce sales pie. The prediction comes on the heels of a revised 2020 social commerce forecast: from 19.8 percent growth to 37.9 percent growth.

Social Commerce Hot Spots

Because of their focus on images, Instagram and Pinterest have a leg up on displaying merchandise; it’s probably no coincidence, then, that both platforms, as eMarketer points out, “provide the most relevant social commerce experiences for brands today.” Instagram and Pinterest have also been enjoying exceptionally strong growth. And both sites have been very proactive about developing business tools that make it easier to sell products and services online.

For example, Pinterest offers tools such as:

  • Product Pins, through which a business can connect its product catalog to Pinterest, filter and organize inventory, create shopping ads, and measure results.
  • Promoted Pins, which appear in search results and home feed as regular pins do, but are targeted and boosted to deliver more reach. Users can pin them to boards, comment on them, and share them. Note that after a Promoted Pin is shared once by a Pinner, the “Promoted” label disappears, with repins considered “earned media.”
  • Promoted Carousels, which feature two to five swipeable images. This can be a useful format for brands wishing to showcase multiple products or features.

But it’s Instagram that has really rocked social commerce by continuously offering tools that make it easier for brands to use the platform for sales. Consider features such as:

  • Instagram checkout, which facilitates simple, convenient, and secure purchases made directly from Instagram. As we’ve blogged, shopping from Instagram means protected payment information is kept in one place. So Instagrammers can shop multiple favorite brands without having to log in and enter intel multiple times.
  • Instagram Live, which allows checkout-enabled businesses to sell products through “live shopping.” In live shopping, consumers might be inspired by a creator or brand’s live video content and subsequently buy promoted products in real-time.

Platforms such as Facebook, Snapchat, and TikTok are also making moves to stay competitive. As we’ve blogged, TikTok has been doubling down on social commerce, especially in the arena of livestreaming. Consider the site’s recent collaboration with Walmart, in which shoppers could check out Walmart’s TikTok profile to see fashions highlighted by TikTok creators like Michael Le (it’s worth noting that categories like apparel/accessories really lend themselves to social commerce). Using mobile checkout, consumers could then buy the same products they saw in the livestream.

What You Should Do

Eager to incorporate social commerce into your marketing plan? We recommend that you:

  • Do your homework on your audience. Not all social commerce platforms are the same. Pinterest tends to appeal to Millennial women, TikTok to Gen Z and Millennials as a whole. Ask yourself: what demographics am I trying to reach?
  • Learn how to use the tools available to you. Each platform will have its own requirements for creating content. In addition, all of these popular sites will require a strong understanding of how to use visuals — it behooves you to make creating powerful imagery a strength. Finally, if you choose to get into live commerce, you’ll need to get really savvy about using livestreaming effectively.
  • Make sure you are set up for success. As we discussed on our blog in January, many businesses are struggling to manage the surge in demand that happens when they attract more shoppers with an intent to buy. Make sure your online fulfillment can handle the demand.

Contact True Interactive

How might social commerce fit into your brand’s digital marketing plan? Contact us. We can help. Read about our expertise in online shopping here.

Photo by Jakob Owens on Unsplash

2021 Advertising and Marketing Predictions from True Interactive

2021 Advertising and Marketing Predictions from True Interactive

Advertising

If 2020 had a few surprises up its sleeve, the year certainly set the stage for 2021. In the months ahead, businesses are poised to transition more boldly to a digital-first economy, which includes a more seamless approach to e-commerce and increased opportunities for engaging with people through immersive experiences such as e-sports. At the same time, businesses will continue to navigate an increasingly complicated consumer privacy landscape. All those trends, and others, will influence the uptake of digital advertising and marketing in 2021. Read on for our fearless predictions for the year:

E-commerce Grows Up

We’ve all heard the same statistic bandied about: in 2020, the pandemic accelerated the shift to e-commerce by five years, according to IBM. But that doesn’t mean the acceleration went smoothly. As we saw during the holiday season, the surge in online commerce has exposed cracks in the seams for many retailers. Sellers struggled with a variety of issues ranging from stocking items properly to following through with orders. Going into 2021, these challenges are forcing companies to integrate all their processes (online, in store, shipping logistics, etc.) more seamlessly. Larger retailers such as Target and Walmart have already successfully expanded services such as curbside pick-up, which make it possible for shoppers to buy online and pick up merchandise at the store without needing to go inside. Going forward, they’ll follow Amazon’s lead and invest more in their own shipping and delivery services to own the order fulfillment process (Target and Walmart already have them – they’re still refining them, though). As we have seen during the holidays, the strain on shipping services such as FedEx and UPS is becoming unacceptable to retailers, and if they lack the resources to build out their own delivery services, they will partner with businesses such as InstaCart.

In addition, learning from the events of 2020, retailers will likely become more nimble in their approach to advertising and supply chain management in order to adapt to quickly changing shifts in consumer demand. They’re going to do a better job using tools such as Google Insights to adapt their campaigns to consumer behavior. The key will be to ensure their supply chain processes are as nimble.

— Kurt Anagnostopoulos, co-founder

Rough Sledding for Facebook

It may be rough sledding ahead for Facebook in 2021. Do a quick Google News search for Facebook and you will see a slew of articles depicting the challenges the social media giant currently faces. At the top of the list? News that more than 40 attorneys general and the U.S. government are expected to sue Facebook for alleged antitrust violations. And while Mark Zuckerberg has routinely appeared at congressional hearings addressing concerns of privacy, misinformation, and censorship, this latest lawsuit might be a final awakening for businesses who use Facebook as an ad platform.

Adding to Facebook’s already uphill battle is the release of the Netflix documentary, The Social Dilemma, which explores the dangerous human impact of social network platforms as told by tech experts who expose secrets behind their own creations. Many media outlets reported a wave of people canceling their social media accounts after viewing the documentary. Of course, Facebook has slammed the documentary, claiming it’s full of misinformation, but is the damage already done? Even if the documentary did not get all the details right, it has undeniably affected public perception of social media platforms. And if even a fraction of current users de-activate their accounts, this will absolutely have a negative impact on audience size available to advertisers. More importantly, with the continued negative publicity surrounding the biggest social media platforms, are businesses really going to want to ramp spend on Facebook and Instagram? My prediction is no. After a crazy year filled with pandemic fears and general social unrest, I do not believe businesses are looking to invest in platforms embroiled in controversy. And if media spend is pulled from some of the social media giants, it may leave the door open for other search engines or community-based ad platforms to emerge. Stay tuned!

— Beth Bauch, director, digital marketing

Walmart Gains Ground as an Ad Platform

The Walmart marketplace is still very much in its infancy. I believe that 2021 will lead to exponential growth of Walmart’s advertising services, and the company will become more competitive with Amazon in this regard. The current platform is still very small scale and, technically, still in beta or just out of it. Many larger advertisers have not been invited to join the Walmart marketplace because it is still so brand new. I believe that Walmart will enjoy a large jump in advertising on their app and site Q1-Q2 2021.

— Tim Colucci, vice president, digital marketing

Augmented Reality Takes Hold

I think in 2021 we will see more brands invest money into creating virtual experiences for their customers. Augmented reality (AR) was already becoming popular before the onset of COVID-19, but now, given the urgency to shop online during the pandemic, consumers are missing the in-store experience of physically trying on items. And retailers are responding with AR: Warby Parker, for example, has created a virtual try-on for their glasses via their app. My glasses broke this weekend, and instead of going to a Warby Parker store to try on different frames, I could use their app to see what the glasses would look like on me, and felt more confident ordering online. Another brand capitalizing on the opportunities inherent in AR? A make-up line called NARS. They allow you to experiment with their products, such as blush and eye shadow, through a virtual try-on feature. Overall, I think more retail brands will create virtual shopping experiences for their customers in 2021.

— Taylor Hart, senior digital marketing manager

E-sports Dominates

The world of e-sports is never one to stop changing. With e-sports accumulating a total revenue that reached more than $1 billion in 2020 (a $150 million increase from 2019), we can only expect that to continue to rise in 2021. Given the ongoing global pandemic and application of stricter stay-at-home rules, more and more people will turn to e-sports as another form of entertainment. It all starts with streaming services that allow e-sports players to become household names in the gaming industry. Giving these players an opportunity to reach tens, potentially hundreds of thousands of viewers without leaving their home is something advertisers can only dream of. Players will do sponsored streams, with designated ad reads to be presented at certain points during the broadcast. The NFL is also getting involved with Twitch (the biggest live streaming platform), getting some of the big name streamers (e.g., NICKMERCS and TimTheTatman) to watch Thursday Night Football on stream with various advertisers as sponsors. Watch for more professional sports and entertainment services to follow in the footsteps of the NFL and try to reach this large, somewhat untapped market.

— Max Petrungaro, digital marketing associate

Privacy Dominates the Executive Agenda

For years, CEOs and CMOs have treated consumer privacy as a problem for their information technology teams to worry about. No longer. Privacy is rapidly becoming a C-level problem that can damage a company’s reputation if managed poorly. A variety of forces have elevated the importance of privacy in the United States. First off, the state of California rolled out a tough privacy act, the California Consumer Privacy Act, in January 2020, and then made the law more strict in November. Because California is one of the world’s largest economies and is a bellwether state, what happens there will influence how other states treat consumer privacy. In addition, the big technology firms are already under close scrutiny, and the new presidential administration is likely to take an even closer look at their privacy practices.

Speaking of the tech giants – their actions are casting a spotlight on privacy. As widely reported, Facebook has launched a public campaign attacking Apple’s privacy iOS 14 updates, which are going to make it harder for Facebook and other platforms to target users with ads. Meanwhile, Google continues to move forward with its plans to stop supporting third-party cookies on the Chrome browser by 2022 – an action that continues to reverberate across the ad industry. In 2021, businesses will face a year of transition as they navigate an increasingly complicated consumer privacy landscape. The challenge involves more than reacting to changes in legislation and cookie tracking technology; advertisers also need to stay on top of emerging tools such as Verizon Media’s ConnectID, designed to manage ads without the use of third-party cookies. School will be in session constantly.

— Mark Smith, co-founder

More Social Shopping

With the world of online shopping expanding in 2020 due to the pandemic, I predict that 2021 will bring new ways to shop across social. Instagram has already released its e-commerce store to elevate shopping online. I predict that the platform will continue to refine its online shopping tools, even as more social networks follow Instagram’s lead and create additional opportunities for shopping right from consumer smart devices.

— Bella Schneider, digital marketing manager

Online Video Explodes

Online video is going to explode as the number of streaming services expands. I believe we are also going to see a cheaper, monthly subscription option (akin to the base Hulu subscription) that includes video ads as a way to subsidize lower-cost services. It is rumored that HBO Max will offer this option, but I believe we will see similar offerings from Peacock, Disney+/Hulu (which I believe will be combined at some point . . . in 2021?), and Amazon Prime. I think the opportunity for more ad space is going to be too good to pass up as more and more consumers cut the cord OR sign up for multiple streaming services. In addition, I believe we will see other live TV options becoming available from streaming services: cord cutters will still have the opportunity for live TV . . .  plus the ad space that goes along with it.

— Tim Colucci, vice president, digital marketing

Contact True Interactive

To succeed with online advertising, contact True Interactive. Read about some of our client work here.

Photo by Ian Taylor on Unsplash

Four Great Holiday Ads You Need to See Right Now

Four Great Holiday Ads You Need to See Right Now

Advertising

Brands face special challenges this year with holiday ads. How do you strike the right tone during a global pandemic? Is it OK to show people being together? As it turns out, people just want to see good holiday ads. A recent Ace Metrix report finds that ad campaigns referencing the reality of Covid-19 fare slightly better with viewers, but not in any meaningful way. So what does a successful ad look like this year? As the following examples attest, there are still many ways to tell a story.

Resilience and Love

Some brands, like Coca-Cola, aren’t so much depicting life during the pandemic as underlining the qualities that serve us well, good times or bad. In Coca-Cola’s global spot, a dad takes an epic journey to deliver his daughter’s letter to Santa. The ad covers a lot of ground, following Dad as he scales cliffs, swims seas, and braves snow and ice to make his delivery. The story comes full circle when Santa makes wishes come true and delivers the intrepid traveler safely home. Resilience and love screen well any time, but during a pandemic year, those themes seem to resonate more than ever.

Even Santa Gets Stressed

Xfinity, by contrast, addressed the year just past more directly. In “The Greatest Gift,” Steve Carell appears as a maxed-out Santa who takes it upon himself to wow kids the world over after an unprecedented 2020. The ad nods to 2020 realities: Santa has to videoconference with his elves, for example, at one point forgetting to take himself off Mute. When an enterprising elf suggests packaging traditional holiday cheer in a new way, the ad brings its message home: that is, technology can bring people together, even when they can’t gather in person. And Carell is an inspired Santa, grounding the spot in humor as he frets and stress-eats his way to what ends up being the perfect solution. Ultimately, “The Greatest Gift” does a masterful job of acknowledging the year just past without getting stuck in a bleak place. As Carell noted in a statement, “The holidays are really about moments of togetherness with the people you love, and serve as a reminder for what’s most important, especially given the hardships of this past year. I hope that this sweet little story will bring a bit of cheer.”

Magical Surrealism Meets Burgeoning Talent

Apple takes a slightly different tack, elevating music as the harbinger of good cheer this season. The tech company, which seems to have an eye for new talent (past Apple ads have featured artists like Billie Eilish), this year gives American rapper and songwriter Tierra Whack a platform. And Whack is a revelation, bringing charisma, whimsy, and music to the new spot for Apple’s HomePod Mini voice assistant. Two Whack songs —“Feel Good” and “Pepper and Onions”— are featured in the spot, which opens with a downtrodden Whack returning home on a cold night, and ends on a note of magically surreal color and song. The ad’s theme? Music can boost our mood. It’s a joyful, welcome reminder during a long, strange year—and a nifty introduction to an emerging talent.

If You Don’t Laugh, You’ll Cry

Finally, check out the Match.com ad that in essence throws up its hands and says, with the kind of off-the-chain year 2020 has been, we may as well laugh rather than cry. The spot, created by Ryan Reynolds’ creative company Maximum Effort, asks what might happen if Satan met 2020 personified? Answer? The chemistry, including TP hoarding and selfies in front of a blazing dumpster, is amazing! As Reynolds said in a statement to TODAY, “Match is responsible for bringing millions of people together and even in this dumpster fire of a year, people somehow found love on Match. We just imagined what a ‘2020 match’ would look like and this video was the natural, slightly warped result.”

Realistic Optimism

It’s worth noting that these ads, while varying widely in theme and approach, do all aim for a certain north star—what Liz Matthews, senior VP of brand, creative and experiential marketing at Dell Technologies calls “realistic optimism.” The magic of these ads is that they don’t give into fear, even as they demonstrate empathy through storytelling or humor. It’s a delicate balancing act, but as Matthews notes, “It all comes down to remembering the human side of your brand. Tap into that to make sure you are delivering a message that aims to connect, not instill uncertainty.”

Contact True Interactive

Looking to establish that elusive blend of humanity and realism in your digital advertising? While striking that balance can seem like capturing lightning in a bottle, as these ads demonstrate, it’s not out of reach. Contact us. We can help.

How Nextdoor Helps Businesses Connect with their Communities

How Nextdoor Helps Businesses Connect with their Communities

Advertising

As people are spending more time close to home, Nextdoor, the social networking service for neighborhoods, is capturing more interest: from users, and also from brands. That’s because Nextdoor is more than a place for people to hang out and talk to one another about what’s going on in their neighborhood—it’s also a place to advertise. Nextdoor is especially appealing to businesses that have a local presence. According to a national consumer survey by Access Development, 93 percent of consumers typically travel less than 20 minutes to make their everyday purchases—a powerful incentive for local businesses to make themselves known. As the platform grows, there is serious talk of Nextdoor going public, too. Let’s take a closer look at how Nextdoor can play a role in connecting brands with their communities.

What Is Nextdoor?

Nextdoor, founded in 2008, describes itself as a platform “where communities come together to greet newcomers, exchange recommendations, and read the latest local news.” Users can report on local news, ask about local service-provider recommendations (according to Hootsuite, “67% of members share business recommendations with their neighbours”), and access local-community alerts during extreme weather. Think of it as a sort of virtual town hall.

Who hangs out on Nextdoor?

The app is currently used in 11 countries worldwide—countries including Germany, the United Kingdom, Australia, and the United States. In the U.S. alone, according to Nextdoor, one in four households use the platform. Sixty-two percent of users are female, and 74 percent are homeowners. But insights derived from Nextdoor go beyond clinical stats. In an article that appeared in The Atlantic, writer Ian Bogost notes how the platform can offer a nuanced peek into life in any given neighborhood. Bogost says, “Nextdoor’s virtual communities—which cover more than 180,000 U.S. neighborhoods, including more than 90 percent of those in the 25 largest [American] cities—are becoming representative of the country’s actual populations.” In short, the platform is a mirror a community holds up to itself: “this is who I am.” And that’s powerful intel for a brand looking to connect with the people who live nearby.

How Does a brand Engage with Nextdoor Users?

Once a company creates a business account on Nextdoor, it can use the platform to run Local Deal ads, which could look like anything from $2 off a sandwich to an online discount code. By connecting with the community on the platform, brands can also get a sense of how they are perceived by locals. As Hootsuite details here, a participating business should track metrics, anything from how many recommendations it’s earning to the number of times users clicked on its Local Deals to see more information.

Companies can also elevate awareness through participation in initiatives like the annual Nextdoor Favorites Competition (according to Nextdoor, winners of this competition benefit by earning up to 30 times the recommendations on their business page as compared to the average).

Finally, sponsored posts on Nextdoor allow brands—usually large regional advertisers—to reach out in myriad ways, from videos, to carousels showcasing products and services, to “click to call” functions allowing users to call a brand directly from Nextdoor’s in-app newsfeed.

What Makes a Successful Sponsored Post?

Like any advertising, sponsored posts require an understanding of the audience and the medium. Nextdoor recommends that sponsored posts be:

  • Content might offer tips or solutions. Brands might also include a deal to inspire consumer interest—and action.
  • Tone can be everything! A neighborly tone paired with appealing imagery encourages engagement.
  • A post that references local landmarks or a specific neighborhood invites recognition and resonance.

Contact True Interactive

Does Nextdoor’s friendly outreach look interesting? Wondering what next steps you can take to connect your brand with local consumers? Call us. We can help.

Why Procter & Gamble Is Succeeding (Hint: Advertising!)

Why Procter & Gamble Is Succeeding (Hint: Advertising!)

Advertising

Procter & Gamble has exploded analyst predictions for the company’s just-concluded fiscal first quarter. Organic sales are up to $19.3 billion, a jump of nine percent; net earnings have risen 19 percent; and there’s no indication that, as the pandemic grinds on, people are trading down to cheaper products. Why is P&G succeeding? It’s not just because it’s selling the right products at the right time. Read on to learn more about how:

P&G Is Prepared for the Moment

According to statista.com, P&G ranked as one of the Top 5 advertisers in 2019 based on the company’s ad spend. This is important to recognize because, even before COVID-19 was a glimmer on the horizon, the company was keeping in the forefront of consumer’s minds. P&G’s strategy was sound, predicated on the fact that during flu season, people naturally want to stock up on cleaning products. And although the company had no idea a pandemic would soon eclipse the flu in severity, its strategy and preparation mentality, rooted in strong advertising, served P&G well. When COVID-19 hit and consumers rushed to purchase cleaning products, P&G product name awareness was already high.

P&G Never Wavers from Creativity

The company’s advertising isn’t just timely, it’s creative. P&G consistently rolls out innovative, culturally relevant campaigns with digital at the center. For example:

  • During a year when the pandemic has left many older Americans feeling isolated, P&G’s Ivory brand launched an Acts of Gentle Kindness initiative to support and uplift seniors through distribution of “Ivory gentle care packs.” The packs, which included an assortment of Ivory products, cozy accessories like socks, and puzzles/brain games, celebrated World Kindness Day by focusing “on spreading positivity.” For the initiative, Ivory partnered with TV personality Catherine (Giudici) Lowe and Cavanaugh Bell, the seven-year-old Chief Positivity Creator at nonprofit organization Cool & Dope. Both encouraged families to get involved and create care packs for their own communities; the resulting stories could be shared on Instagram, Facebook, or Pinterest with the hashtag #IvoryKindness.

Woman and Child

  • P&G’s Skinclusive Summer Line by Venus celebrated the many skins we’re in by partnering with the popular Animal Crossing video game series. During a summer when going to the beach wasn’t necessarily a slam dunk due to COVID-19, Animal Crossing became a way to hit the beach virtually. And the game, which is especially popular among women aged 19-24, took self-expression to a new level: Gillette Venus partnered with digital designer Nicole Cuddihy to co-create new “skin-clusive” avatar designs. The game, which originally offered just a few representative skin types for its avatars, now gives players a choice of 250+ designs encompassing 19 different skin types and eight in-game skin tones. Notably, common skin features such as acne, cellulite, vitiligo, and tattoos are represented. Cuddihy notes, “While momentum for diversity in design is building, there are many areas where progress feels slow. The fact that I could add scars and wrinkles to warriors or outlaws, but not characters in less combat-driven games felt discouraging. With these designs, I hope that all women in Animal Crossing can find comfort and representation in this carefully developed collection. I drew inspiration from those in my own life to ensure the designs I was creating accurately represented their skin stories in a way that feels real, celebratory and beautiful.”

Animal Crossing

P&G Is Preparing for the Future

Per Ad Age, P&G does not seem inclined to tighten the purse strings when it comes to marketing: marketing spending for P&G grew at least $100 million last quarter. As Vice Chairman and Chief Financial Officer Jon Moeller said, “We view this as a time to spend forward in terms of our advertising levels, not to spend back. First, there’s never been more media consumed than there is currently, as we all try to entertain ourselves and our families and survive. And two there’s a heightened need to spend on hygiene and health.”

The message is clear: P&G isn’t afraid to invest in advertising. And as we recently blogged, it’s important that all businesses keep their eyes on the ball by maintaining brand awareness with advertising: now, and going forward.

Contact True Interactive

How can your brand benefit from digital advertising? Contact us. We can help.